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Neighborhood Landscape Spatial Patterns and Land Surface Temperature: An Empirical Study on Single-Family Residential Areas in Austin, Texas

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Rapid urbanization has accelerated land use and land cover changes, and generated the urban heat island effect (UHI). Previous studies have reported positive effects of neighborhood landscapes on mitigating urban surface temperatures. However, the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on enhancing cooling effects has not yet been fully investigated. The main objective of this study was to assess the relationships between neighborhood landscape spatial patterns and land surface temperatures (LST) by using multi-regression models considering spatial autocorrelation issues. To measure the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on LST, this study analyzed neighborhood environments of 15,862 single-family houses in Austin, Texas, USA. Using aerial photos, geographic information systems (GIS), and remote sensing, FRAGSTATS was employed to calculate values of several landscape indices used to measure neighborhood landscape spatial patterns. After controlling for the spatial autocorrelation effect, results showed that larger and better-connected landscape spatial patterns were positively correlated with lower LST values in neighborhoods, while more fragmented and isolated neighborhood landscape patterns were negatively related to the reduction of LST.

No MeSH data available.


The distribution of the final study samples (a) and LST (b).
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ijerph-13-00880-f001: The distribution of the final study samples (a) and LST (b).

Mentions: We initially collected 31,670 residential parcel data in Travis County from the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) data provided by the Austin Board of Realtors®. From the full dataset, this research eventually selected 15,862 samples of single-family homes after excluding 15,808 samples. Those samples were excluded because they did not show geo-reference points to locate the neighborhood in geographic information systems (GIS) analysis and were listed as multi-family properties. Figure 1 shows: (a) the distribution of the final sample at the census block groups, and (b) the distribution of LST on the research area location in August. The samples were distributed over most urban areas in Austin. The housing density of the study area is 484.06 housing units per one square kilometer, and it is significantly higher than the average density (304.84) of other metropolitan areas in the U.S. The percentage of green space is 14.2% (109.65 km2), and it is 0.12 km2 per 1000 people. The LST varies within the study area by built and natural environments, and it follows the annual temperature range.


Neighborhood Landscape Spatial Patterns and Land Surface Temperature: An Empirical Study on Single-Family Residential Areas in Austin, Texas
The distribution of the final study samples (a) and LST (b).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036713&req=5

ijerph-13-00880-f001: The distribution of the final study samples (a) and LST (b).
Mentions: We initially collected 31,670 residential parcel data in Travis County from the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) data provided by the Austin Board of Realtors®. From the full dataset, this research eventually selected 15,862 samples of single-family homes after excluding 15,808 samples. Those samples were excluded because they did not show geo-reference points to locate the neighborhood in geographic information systems (GIS) analysis and were listed as multi-family properties. Figure 1 shows: (a) the distribution of the final sample at the census block groups, and (b) the distribution of LST on the research area location in August. The samples were distributed over most urban areas in Austin. The housing density of the study area is 484.06 housing units per one square kilometer, and it is significantly higher than the average density (304.84) of other metropolitan areas in the U.S. The percentage of green space is 14.2% (109.65 km2), and it is 0.12 km2 per 1000 people. The LST varies within the study area by built and natural environments, and it follows the annual temperature range.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Rapid urbanization has accelerated land use and land cover changes, and generated the urban heat island effect (UHI). Previous studies have reported positive effects of neighborhood landscapes on mitigating urban surface temperatures. However, the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on enhancing cooling effects has not yet been fully investigated. The main objective of this study was to assess the relationships between neighborhood landscape spatial patterns and land surface temperatures (LST) by using multi-regression models considering spatial autocorrelation issues. To measure the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on LST, this study analyzed neighborhood environments of 15,862 single-family houses in Austin, Texas, USA. Using aerial photos, geographic information systems (GIS), and remote sensing, FRAGSTATS was employed to calculate values of several landscape indices used to measure neighborhood landscape spatial patterns. After controlling for the spatial autocorrelation effect, results showed that larger and better-connected landscape spatial patterns were positively correlated with lower LST values in neighborhoods, while more fragmented and isolated neighborhood landscape patterns were negatively related to the reduction of LST.

No MeSH data available.