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Distribution of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Its Relationship with Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the Middle-Aged Chinese Population

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ABSTRACT

Background: An increased concentration of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) indicates risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Because the available data is limited, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2009–2010 to describe hs-CRP distribution and its relationship with established CVD risk factors. Methods: A population-based sample of adults aged 35 to 64 years (n = 14,046) was taken from 12 research populations across China. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded, and hs-CRP measured. Pearson’s and Kendall’s tau-b correlation coefficient, and multiple regression analyses were used to test the relationship between hs-CRP and other CVD risk factors. Results: For 8389 (4412 females) eligible participants, hs-CRP was 1.89 ± 4.37 mg/L (median (25th, 75th): 0.80 (0.40, 1.80)), and increased with age, BP, glucose, and BMI (p < 0.05), males had significantly higher hs-CRP than females (2.07 (4.89) vs. 1.73 (3.83), p < 0.001). About 24.3% had the hs-CRP concentrations more than the top quartile (25.8% in males, 22.9% in females), 12.3% (13.3% in males, 11.5% in females) >3 mg/L. There was a significant positive correlation of quartiles of hs-CRP concentrations with age, SBP, DBP, glucose level, BMI, LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, and LDL-C/total cholesterol ratio (p < 0.001). The elevated hs-CRP (>1.80 mg/L) related positively with age, LDL-C, BP, glucose, BMI, and living north and negatively with HDL-C/TC, LDL-C/TC, TC independently (p < 0.05). For subjects with coexisting hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, and obesity, about 63.0% were in the top quartile of hs-CRP concentrations. Conclusions: Hs-CRP was associated with most of the known CVD risk factors. Measurement of hs-CRP may provide a more comprehensive view of the patient’s overall risk profile in the Chinese population.

No MeSH data available.


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Proportion of hs-CRP in patients with different risk factor combinations; Hs-CRP, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein; HBP, high blood pressure; DM, diabetes mellitus; HTC, high total cholesterol.
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ijerph-13-00872-f001: Proportion of hs-CRP in patients with different risk factor combinations; Hs-CRP, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein; HBP, high blood pressure; DM, diabetes mellitus; HTC, high total cholesterol.

Mentions: Moreover, for subjects with hypertension, about 31.1% were in the top quartile of hs-CRP concentrations; for subjects with coexisting hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, and obesity, 63.0% in the top quartile (Figure 1).


Distribution of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Its Relationship with Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the Middle-Aged Chinese Population
Proportion of hs-CRP in patients with different risk factor combinations; Hs-CRP, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein; HBP, high blood pressure; DM, diabetes mellitus; HTC, high total cholesterol.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036705&req=5

ijerph-13-00872-f001: Proportion of hs-CRP in patients with different risk factor combinations; Hs-CRP, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein; HBP, high blood pressure; DM, diabetes mellitus; HTC, high total cholesterol.
Mentions: Moreover, for subjects with hypertension, about 31.1% were in the top quartile of hs-CRP concentrations; for subjects with coexisting hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, and obesity, 63.0% in the top quartile (Figure 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: An increased concentration of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) indicates risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Because the available data is limited, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2009–2010 to describe hs-CRP distribution and its relationship with established CVD risk factors. Methods: A population-based sample of adults aged 35 to 64 years (n = 14,046) was taken from 12 research populations across China. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded, and hs-CRP measured. Pearson’s and Kendall’s tau-b correlation coefficient, and multiple regression analyses were used to test the relationship between hs-CRP and other CVD risk factors. Results: For 8389 (4412 females) eligible participants, hs-CRP was 1.89 ± 4.37 mg/L (median (25th, 75th): 0.80 (0.40, 1.80)), and increased with age, BP, glucose, and BMI (p < 0.05), males had significantly higher hs-CRP than females (2.07 (4.89) vs. 1.73 (3.83), p < 0.001). About 24.3% had the hs-CRP concentrations more than the top quartile (25.8% in males, 22.9% in females), 12.3% (13.3% in males, 11.5% in females) >3 mg/L. There was a significant positive correlation of quartiles of hs-CRP concentrations with age, SBP, DBP, glucose level, BMI, LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, and LDL-C/total cholesterol ratio (p < 0.001). The elevated hs-CRP (>1.80 mg/L) related positively with age, LDL-C, BP, glucose, BMI, and living north and negatively with HDL-C/TC, LDL-C/TC, TC independently (p < 0.05). For subjects with coexisting hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, and obesity, about 63.0% were in the top quartile of hs-CRP concentrations. Conclusions: Hs-CRP was associated with most of the known CVD risk factors. Measurement of hs-CRP may provide a more comprehensive view of the patient’s overall risk profile in the Chinese population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus