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Tempo-Spatial Variations of Ambient Ozone-Mortality Associations in the USA: Results from the NMMAPS Data

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Although the health effects of ambient ozone have been widely assessed, their tempo-spatial variations remain unclear. We selected 20 communities (ten each from southern and northern USA) based on the US National Morbidity, Mortality, and Air Pollution Study (NMMAPS) dataset. A generalized linear model (GLM) was used to estimate the season-specific association between each 10 ppb (lag0-2 day average) increment in daily 8 h maximum ozone concentration and mortality in every community. The results showed that in the southern communities, a 10 ppb increment in ozone was linked to an increment of mortality of −0.07%, −0.17%, 0.40% and 0.27% in spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively. For the northern communities, the excess risks (ERs) were 0.74%, 1.21%, 0.52% and −0.65% in the spring, summer, autumn and winter seasons, respectively. City-specific ozone-related mortality effects were positively related with latitude, but negatively related with seasonal average temperature in the spring, summer and autumn seasons. However, a reverse relationship was found in the winter. We concluded that there were different seasonal patterns of ozone effects on mortality between southern and northern US communities. Latitude and seasonal average temperature were identified as modifiers of the ambient ozone-related mortality risks.

No MeSH data available.


The summary effects of ambient ozone on mortality in each season of southern and northern US communities. Note: All results were adjusted for daily mean temperature (TM), time, day of week and relative humidity (RH).
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ijerph-13-00851-f002: The summary effects of ambient ozone on mortality in each season of southern and northern US communities. Note: All results were adjusted for daily mean temperature (TM), time, day of week and relative humidity (RH).

Mentions: Forest plots in Figure 2 show the summary effects of ambient ozone on mortality in each season of southern and northern communities. In the southern communities, ambient ozone had more pronounced associations with mortality in autumn and winter than in spring and summer. Particularly, in autumn a 10 ppb increase in lag0-2 day average ozone concentration was significantly associated with an increase of 0.40% (95% CI: 0.05% ~ 0.75%) mortality risk. In contrast, we observed a different pattern of ambient ozone-related effects in the northern communities. Stronger effects of ozone were found in spring, summer and autumn than in winter. Ozone exposure in summer had the strongest effect on mortality among the four seasons. A 10 ppb increase in lag0-2 day average ozone concentration in summer was associated with an increase of 1.21% (95% CI: 0.72% ~ 1.71%) mortality risk (Table S1).


Tempo-Spatial Variations of Ambient Ozone-Mortality Associations in the USA: Results from the NMMAPS Data
The summary effects of ambient ozone on mortality in each season of southern and northern US communities. Note: All results were adjusted for daily mean temperature (TM), time, day of week and relative humidity (RH).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036684&req=5

ijerph-13-00851-f002: The summary effects of ambient ozone on mortality in each season of southern and northern US communities. Note: All results were adjusted for daily mean temperature (TM), time, day of week and relative humidity (RH).
Mentions: Forest plots in Figure 2 show the summary effects of ambient ozone on mortality in each season of southern and northern communities. In the southern communities, ambient ozone had more pronounced associations with mortality in autumn and winter than in spring and summer. Particularly, in autumn a 10 ppb increase in lag0-2 day average ozone concentration was significantly associated with an increase of 0.40% (95% CI: 0.05% ~ 0.75%) mortality risk. In contrast, we observed a different pattern of ambient ozone-related effects in the northern communities. Stronger effects of ozone were found in spring, summer and autumn than in winter. Ozone exposure in summer had the strongest effect on mortality among the four seasons. A 10 ppb increase in lag0-2 day average ozone concentration in summer was associated with an increase of 1.21% (95% CI: 0.72% ~ 1.71%) mortality risk (Table S1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Although the health effects of ambient ozone have been widely assessed, their tempo-spatial variations remain unclear. We selected 20 communities (ten each from southern and northern USA) based on the US National Morbidity, Mortality, and Air Pollution Study (NMMAPS) dataset. A generalized linear model (GLM) was used to estimate the season-specific association between each 10 ppb (lag0-2 day average) increment in daily 8 h maximum ozone concentration and mortality in every community. The results showed that in the southern communities, a 10 ppb increment in ozone was linked to an increment of mortality of −0.07%, −0.17%, 0.40% and 0.27% in spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively. For the northern communities, the excess risks (ERs) were 0.74%, 1.21%, 0.52% and −0.65% in the spring, summer, autumn and winter seasons, respectively. City-specific ozone-related mortality effects were positively related with latitude, but negatively related with seasonal average temperature in the spring, summer and autumn seasons. However, a reverse relationship was found in the winter. We concluded that there were different seasonal patterns of ozone effects on mortality between southern and northern US communities. Latitude and seasonal average temperature were identified as modifiers of the ambient ozone-related mortality risks.

No MeSH data available.