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Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection-induced chronic bronchitis and emphysematous changes in CCSP-deficient mice

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The club cell secretory protein (CCSP) is a regulator of lung inflammation following acute respiratory infection or lung injury. Recently, the relationship between CCSP and COPD has been reported. Since COPD results from an abnormal inflammatory response, we hypothesized that CCSP could have a protective role against chronic inflammation-induced lung damage. To address this issue, the pathophysiology of chronic lung inflammation induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in CCSP-deficient mice was determined. A tube of 5 mm in length was soaked in a fluid containing P. aeruginosa (PAO01 strain) for 1 week and inserted into the trachea of CCSP-deficient mice. One week later, P. aeruginosa was administered into the trachea. Five weeks after insertion of tube, the mice were sacrificed. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were collected to determine the bacterial growth, and the lung histology and physiology were also examined. P. aeruginosa was continuously detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids during the study. Neutrophils were increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from the CCSP-deficient mice in comparison to wild-type mice. A histological study demonstrated chronic inflammation around bronchus, serious bronchial stenosis, and alveolar enlargement in the CCSP-deficient mice. The lung physiology study demonstrated an increase in the lung compliance of the CCSP-deficient mice. Chronic P. aeruginosa inflammation resulted in chronic bronchitis and emphysematous changes in the CCSP-deficient mice. CCSP could play an important role in protecting the host from the chronic inflammation-induced lung damage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schema of the animal model.Notes: (A) A tube of length 5 mm was soaked in the fluid containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO01 strain at a concentration of 1×106 colony forming units (CFU)/mL for 1 week. The tube was inserted into mice via tracheostomy. Seven days after tube insertion, 5×104 CFU/animal of P. aeruginosa was administered into mice intranasally. Four weeks after intranasal administration, animals were sacrificed. (B) The numbers of P. aeruginosa CFU in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids at 1 and 4 weeks after intranasal administration of P. aeruginosa were 11×104 CFU/mL and 6×104 CFU/mL, respectively. P. aeruginosa was continuously detected in the BAL fluids over the course of 4 weeks. Each group consisted of three mice.Abbreviation:P. aeruginosa, Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
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f1-copd-11-2321: Schema of the animal model.Notes: (A) A tube of length 5 mm was soaked in the fluid containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO01 strain at a concentration of 1×106 colony forming units (CFU)/mL for 1 week. The tube was inserted into mice via tracheostomy. Seven days after tube insertion, 5×104 CFU/animal of P. aeruginosa was administered into mice intranasally. Four weeks after intranasal administration, animals were sacrificed. (B) The numbers of P. aeruginosa CFU in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids at 1 and 4 weeks after intranasal administration of P. aeruginosa were 11×104 CFU/mL and 6×104 CFU/mL, respectively. P. aeruginosa was continuously detected in the BAL fluids over the course of 4 weeks. Each group consisted of three mice.Abbreviation:P. aeruginosa, Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Mentions: A bacterial culture of P. aeruginosa (PAO01 strain) was used to cause infection in this study. For animal model, CCSP-deficient mice (CCSP−/−) of the 129 strains background and 129 mice (wild-type) were used.13 First, we made the chronic respiratory infection model of P. aeruginosa with modification of the method previously described.14 An intravenous catheter of external diameter 1 mm was purchased from the Atom Medical Co. (Saitama, Japan). A tube of length 5 mm, which was soaked in fluid containing P. aeruginosa (PAO01 strain) at a concentration of 1×106 CFU/mL for 1 week, was inserted into the trachea of the mice. One week later, P. aeruginosa (5×104 CFU/animal) was administered intranasally; an untreated tube was inserted into the trachea of the control mice. Four weeks after intranasal administration of P. aeruginosa, the mice were sacrificed (Figure 1A). Bacterial growth was examined in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. The cell count in the BAL fluids was determined and the lung histology was also investigated. This study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) of Fukuoka University, and followed the Guidelines for Animal Experimentation, Fukuoka University (based on the Fundamental Guidelines for Proper Conduct of Animal Experiment and Related Activities in Academic Research Institutions under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology). The IACUC is charged with protecting the safety and welfare of animals used in research at or in conjunction with Fukuoka University.


Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection-induced chronic bronchitis and emphysematous changes in CCSP-deficient mice
Schema of the animal model.Notes: (A) A tube of length 5 mm was soaked in the fluid containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO01 strain at a concentration of 1×106 colony forming units (CFU)/mL for 1 week. The tube was inserted into mice via tracheostomy. Seven days after tube insertion, 5×104 CFU/animal of P. aeruginosa was administered into mice intranasally. Four weeks after intranasal administration, animals were sacrificed. (B) The numbers of P. aeruginosa CFU in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids at 1 and 4 weeks after intranasal administration of P. aeruginosa were 11×104 CFU/mL and 6×104 CFU/mL, respectively. P. aeruginosa was continuously detected in the BAL fluids over the course of 4 weeks. Each group consisted of three mice.Abbreviation:P. aeruginosa, Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036550&req=5

f1-copd-11-2321: Schema of the animal model.Notes: (A) A tube of length 5 mm was soaked in the fluid containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO01 strain at a concentration of 1×106 colony forming units (CFU)/mL for 1 week. The tube was inserted into mice via tracheostomy. Seven days after tube insertion, 5×104 CFU/animal of P. aeruginosa was administered into mice intranasally. Four weeks after intranasal administration, animals were sacrificed. (B) The numbers of P. aeruginosa CFU in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids at 1 and 4 weeks after intranasal administration of P. aeruginosa were 11×104 CFU/mL and 6×104 CFU/mL, respectively. P. aeruginosa was continuously detected in the BAL fluids over the course of 4 weeks. Each group consisted of three mice.Abbreviation:P. aeruginosa, Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
Mentions: A bacterial culture of P. aeruginosa (PAO01 strain) was used to cause infection in this study. For animal model, CCSP-deficient mice (CCSP−/−) of the 129 strains background and 129 mice (wild-type) were used.13 First, we made the chronic respiratory infection model of P. aeruginosa with modification of the method previously described.14 An intravenous catheter of external diameter 1 mm was purchased from the Atom Medical Co. (Saitama, Japan). A tube of length 5 mm, which was soaked in fluid containing P. aeruginosa (PAO01 strain) at a concentration of 1×106 CFU/mL for 1 week, was inserted into the trachea of the mice. One week later, P. aeruginosa (5×104 CFU/animal) was administered intranasally; an untreated tube was inserted into the trachea of the control mice. Four weeks after intranasal administration of P. aeruginosa, the mice were sacrificed (Figure 1A). Bacterial growth was examined in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. The cell count in the BAL fluids was determined and the lung histology was also investigated. This study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) of Fukuoka University, and followed the Guidelines for Animal Experimentation, Fukuoka University (based on the Fundamental Guidelines for Proper Conduct of Animal Experiment and Related Activities in Academic Research Institutions under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology). The IACUC is charged with protecting the safety and welfare of animals used in research at or in conjunction with Fukuoka University.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The club cell secretory protein (CCSP) is a regulator of lung inflammation following acute respiratory infection or lung injury. Recently, the relationship between CCSP and COPD has been reported. Since COPD results from an abnormal inflammatory response, we hypothesized that CCSP could have a protective role against chronic inflammation-induced lung damage. To address this issue, the pathophysiology of chronic lung inflammation induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in CCSP-deficient mice was determined. A tube of 5 mm in length was soaked in a fluid containing P. aeruginosa (PAO01 strain) for 1 week and inserted into the trachea of CCSP-deficient mice. One week later, P. aeruginosa was administered into the trachea. Five weeks after insertion of tube, the mice were sacrificed. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were collected to determine the bacterial growth, and the lung histology and physiology were also examined. P. aeruginosa was continuously detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids during the study. Neutrophils were increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from the CCSP-deficient mice in comparison to wild-type mice. A histological study demonstrated chronic inflammation around bronchus, serious bronchial stenosis, and alveolar enlargement in the CCSP-deficient mice. The lung physiology study demonstrated an increase in the lung compliance of the CCSP-deficient mice. Chronic P. aeruginosa inflammation resulted in chronic bronchitis and emphysematous changes in the CCSP-deficient mice. CCSP could play an important role in protecting the host from the chronic inflammation-induced lung damage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus