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TiO 2 nanotube platforms for smart drug delivery: a review

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Titania nanotube (TNT) arrays are recognized as promising materials for localized drug delivery implants because of their excellent properties and facile preparation process. This review highlights the concept of localized drug delivery systems based on TNTs, considering their outstanding biocompatibility in a series of ex vivo and in vivo studies. Considering the safety of TNT implants in the host body, studies of the biocompatibility present significant importance for the clinical application of TNT implants. Toward smart TNT platforms for sustainable drug delivery, several advanced approaches were presented in this review, including controlled release triggered by temperature, light, radiofrequency magnetism, and ultrasonic stimulation. Moreover, TNT implants used in medical therapy have been demonstrated by various examples including dentistry, orthopedic implants, cardiovascular stents, and so on. Finally, a future perspective of TNTs for clinical applications is provided.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic illustration of ultrasound-stimulated DD based on TNT implants and polymeric micelles as drug carriers. Reprinted from Int J Pharm, 443, Aw MS, Losic D, Ultrasound enhanced release of therapeutics from drug-releasing implants based on titania nanotube arrays, 154–162,97 Copyright (2013), with permission from Elsevier.Abbreviations: DD, drug delivery; PBS, phosphate-buffered saline; TNT, titania nanotube.
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f9-ijn-11-4819: Schematic illustration of ultrasound-stimulated DD based on TNT implants and polymeric micelles as drug carriers. Reprinted from Int J Pharm, 443, Aw MS, Losic D, Ultrasound enhanced release of therapeutics from drug-releasing implants based on titania nanotube arrays, 154–162,97 Copyright (2013), with permission from Elsevier.Abbreviations: DD, drug delivery; PBS, phosphate-buffered saline; TNT, titania nanotube.

Mentions: The ultrasound-sensitive drug delivery based on applying the local ultrasonic field is expected to be a more reliable method compared with the magnetic-sensitive drug delivery that is uncontrollable in drug release when triggered by magnetic fields. Aw et al reported the application of local ultrasonic external field for triggering drug release from TNTs.97 In this study, ultrasonic waves were used as the trigger for stimulus-responsive local drug delivery system combining TNT implants as shown in Figure 9. The ultrasound-mediated drug-micelles release based on exerting oscillating pressure waves from a probe inserted in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.2) close to the drug-micelle-loaded TNTs and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (Indomethacin) was used as the model for water insoluble drug encapsulated in polymer micelles. With regard to the application of this concept, it can be applied for bone therapies, local drug delivery, and implantable drug delivery systems including stents and brain drug delivery. Of course, more studies of ex vivo or in vivo models using different drug-releasing implants and drugs are needed to achieve significant understandings based on the concept.


TiO 2 nanotube platforms for smart drug delivery: a review
Schematic illustration of ultrasound-stimulated DD based on TNT implants and polymeric micelles as drug carriers. Reprinted from Int J Pharm, 443, Aw MS, Losic D, Ultrasound enhanced release of therapeutics from drug-releasing implants based on titania nanotube arrays, 154–162,97 Copyright (2013), with permission from Elsevier.Abbreviations: DD, drug delivery; PBS, phosphate-buffered saline; TNT, titania nanotube.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036548&req=5

f9-ijn-11-4819: Schematic illustration of ultrasound-stimulated DD based on TNT implants and polymeric micelles as drug carriers. Reprinted from Int J Pharm, 443, Aw MS, Losic D, Ultrasound enhanced release of therapeutics from drug-releasing implants based on titania nanotube arrays, 154–162,97 Copyright (2013), with permission from Elsevier.Abbreviations: DD, drug delivery; PBS, phosphate-buffered saline; TNT, titania nanotube.
Mentions: The ultrasound-sensitive drug delivery based on applying the local ultrasonic field is expected to be a more reliable method compared with the magnetic-sensitive drug delivery that is uncontrollable in drug release when triggered by magnetic fields. Aw et al reported the application of local ultrasonic external field for triggering drug release from TNTs.97 In this study, ultrasonic waves were used as the trigger for stimulus-responsive local drug delivery system combining TNT implants as shown in Figure 9. The ultrasound-mediated drug-micelles release based on exerting oscillating pressure waves from a probe inserted in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.2) close to the drug-micelle-loaded TNTs and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (Indomethacin) was used as the model for water insoluble drug encapsulated in polymer micelles. With regard to the application of this concept, it can be applied for bone therapies, local drug delivery, and implantable drug delivery systems including stents and brain drug delivery. Of course, more studies of ex vivo or in vivo models using different drug-releasing implants and drugs are needed to achieve significant understandings based on the concept.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Titania nanotube (TNT) arrays are recognized as promising materials for localized drug delivery implants because of their excellent properties and facile preparation process. This review highlights the concept of localized drug delivery systems based on TNTs, considering their outstanding biocompatibility in a series of ex vivo and in vivo studies. Considering the safety of TNT implants in the host body, studies of the biocompatibility present significant importance for the clinical application of TNT implants. Toward smart TNT platforms for sustainable drug delivery, several advanced approaches were presented in this review, including controlled release triggered by temperature, light, radiofrequency magnetism, and ultrasonic stimulation. Moreover, TNT implants used in medical therapy have been demonstrated by various examples including dentistry, orthopedic implants, cardiovascular stents, and so on. Finally, a future perspective of TNTs for clinical applications is provided.

No MeSH data available.