Limits...
TiO 2 nanotube platforms for smart drug delivery: a review

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Titania nanotube (TNT) arrays are recognized as promising materials for localized drug delivery implants because of their excellent properties and facile preparation process. This review highlights the concept of localized drug delivery systems based on TNTs, considering their outstanding biocompatibility in a series of ex vivo and in vivo studies. Considering the safety of TNT implants in the host body, studies of the biocompatibility present significant importance for the clinical application of TNT implants. Toward smart TNT platforms for sustainable drug delivery, several advanced approaches were presented in this review, including controlled release triggered by temperature, light, radiofrequency magnetism, and ultrasonic stimulation. Moreover, TNT implants used in medical therapy have been demonstrated by various examples including dentistry, orthopedic implants, cardiovascular stents, and so on. Finally, a future perspective of TNTs for clinical applications is provided.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

F-actin and nuclear stains of BAEC.Notes: F-actin (green) and nuclear (blue) stains of BAEC grown on (A) TNTs versus (B) flat surfaces for 24 hours. Fluorescence microscopy images (×10) of live marrow stromal cells stained with calcein on (C) Ti and (D) TNT surfaces. (A and B) Reprinted from Biomaterials, 30, Peng L, Eltgroth ML, LaTempa TJ, Grimes CA, Desai TA, The effect of TiO2 nanotubes on endothelial function and smooth muscle proliferation, 1268–1272,55 Copyright (2009), with permission from Elsevier. (C and D) Reprinted from Biomaterials, 28, Popat KC, Leoni L, Grimes CA, Desai TA, Influence of engineered titania nanotubular surfaces on bone cells, 3188–3197,57 Copyright (2007), with permission from Elsevier.Abbreviations: BAEC, bovine aortic endothelial cell; TNT, titania nanotube.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036548&req=5

f2-ijn-11-4819: F-actin and nuclear stains of BAEC.Notes: F-actin (green) and nuclear (blue) stains of BAEC grown on (A) TNTs versus (B) flat surfaces for 24 hours. Fluorescence microscopy images (×10) of live marrow stromal cells stained with calcein on (C) Ti and (D) TNT surfaces. (A and B) Reprinted from Biomaterials, 30, Peng L, Eltgroth ML, LaTempa TJ, Grimes CA, Desai TA, The effect of TiO2 nanotubes on endothelial function and smooth muscle proliferation, 1268–1272,55 Copyright (2009), with permission from Elsevier. (C and D) Reprinted from Biomaterials, 28, Popat KC, Leoni L, Grimes CA, Desai TA, Influence of engineered titania nanotubular surfaces on bone cells, 3188–3197,57 Copyright (2007), with permission from Elsevier.Abbreviations: BAEC, bovine aortic endothelial cell; TNT, titania nanotube.

Mentions: The application of TNTs is a promising alternative to develop various medical implants and devices because of their excellent biocompatibility, mechanical strength, and chemical resistivity; Ti and its alloys have been applied in orthopedic and dental implants for many years.49–54 Most biocompatibility studies of TNTs focused on their significant application in dentistry, orthopedics, and cardiovascular surgery; especially TNT implants presented a great affinity for bone cell adhesion and differentiation. In initial studies, it was demonstrated that the TNT surface could provide an excellent template for bone cell growth and osteoblast activity based on their better cell growth performance than Ti surface.55–58Figure 2A and B reveals that bovine aortic endothelial cells (ECs) on Ti surfaces are more spread out and cover greater surface areas, whereas bovine aortic ECs on TNTs displayed elongated morphologies, which results in bovine aortic ECs on TNTs cover most of the average area occupied by the control cells.55 Popat et al demonstrated that TNT surface could be used as a favorable template for marrow stromal cell growth and differentiation and provided the evidence that the osteoblast activity can be greatly improved by controlling nanotopographies, as shown in Figure 2C and D.57


TiO 2 nanotube platforms for smart drug delivery: a review
F-actin and nuclear stains of BAEC.Notes: F-actin (green) and nuclear (blue) stains of BAEC grown on (A) TNTs versus (B) flat surfaces for 24 hours. Fluorescence microscopy images (×10) of live marrow stromal cells stained with calcein on (C) Ti and (D) TNT surfaces. (A and B) Reprinted from Biomaterials, 30, Peng L, Eltgroth ML, LaTempa TJ, Grimes CA, Desai TA, The effect of TiO2 nanotubes on endothelial function and smooth muscle proliferation, 1268–1272,55 Copyright (2009), with permission from Elsevier. (C and D) Reprinted from Biomaterials, 28, Popat KC, Leoni L, Grimes CA, Desai TA, Influence of engineered titania nanotubular surfaces on bone cells, 3188–3197,57 Copyright (2007), with permission from Elsevier.Abbreviations: BAEC, bovine aortic endothelial cell; TNT, titania nanotube.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036548&req=5

f2-ijn-11-4819: F-actin and nuclear stains of BAEC.Notes: F-actin (green) and nuclear (blue) stains of BAEC grown on (A) TNTs versus (B) flat surfaces for 24 hours. Fluorescence microscopy images (×10) of live marrow stromal cells stained with calcein on (C) Ti and (D) TNT surfaces. (A and B) Reprinted from Biomaterials, 30, Peng L, Eltgroth ML, LaTempa TJ, Grimes CA, Desai TA, The effect of TiO2 nanotubes on endothelial function and smooth muscle proliferation, 1268–1272,55 Copyright (2009), with permission from Elsevier. (C and D) Reprinted from Biomaterials, 28, Popat KC, Leoni L, Grimes CA, Desai TA, Influence of engineered titania nanotubular surfaces on bone cells, 3188–3197,57 Copyright (2007), with permission from Elsevier.Abbreviations: BAEC, bovine aortic endothelial cell; TNT, titania nanotube.
Mentions: The application of TNTs is a promising alternative to develop various medical implants and devices because of their excellent biocompatibility, mechanical strength, and chemical resistivity; Ti and its alloys have been applied in orthopedic and dental implants for many years.49–54 Most biocompatibility studies of TNTs focused on their significant application in dentistry, orthopedics, and cardiovascular surgery; especially TNT implants presented a great affinity for bone cell adhesion and differentiation. In initial studies, it was demonstrated that the TNT surface could provide an excellent template for bone cell growth and osteoblast activity based on their better cell growth performance than Ti surface.55–58Figure 2A and B reveals that bovine aortic endothelial cells (ECs) on Ti surfaces are more spread out and cover greater surface areas, whereas bovine aortic ECs on TNTs displayed elongated morphologies, which results in bovine aortic ECs on TNTs cover most of the average area occupied by the control cells.55 Popat et al demonstrated that TNT surface could be used as a favorable template for marrow stromal cell growth and differentiation and provided the evidence that the osteoblast activity can be greatly improved by controlling nanotopographies, as shown in Figure 2C and D.57

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Titania nanotube (TNT) arrays are recognized as promising materials for localized drug delivery implants because of their excellent properties and facile preparation process. This review highlights the concept of localized drug delivery systems based on TNTs, considering their outstanding biocompatibility in a series of ex vivo and in vivo studies. Considering the safety of TNT implants in the host body, studies of the biocompatibility present significant importance for the clinical application of TNT implants. Toward smart TNT platforms for sustainable drug delivery, several advanced approaches were presented in this review, including controlled release triggered by temperature, light, radiofrequency magnetism, and ultrasonic stimulation. Moreover, TNT implants used in medical therapy have been demonstrated by various examples including dentistry, orthopedic implants, cardiovascular stents, and so on. Finally, a future perspective of TNTs for clinical applications is provided.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus