Limits...
TiO 2 nanotube platforms for smart drug delivery: a review

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Titania nanotube (TNT) arrays are recognized as promising materials for localized drug delivery implants because of their excellent properties and facile preparation process. This review highlights the concept of localized drug delivery systems based on TNTs, considering their outstanding biocompatibility in a series of ex vivo and in vivo studies. Considering the safety of TNT implants in the host body, studies of the biocompatibility present significant importance for the clinical application of TNT implants. Toward smart TNT platforms for sustainable drug delivery, several advanced approaches were presented in this review, including controlled release triggered by temperature, light, radiofrequency magnetism, and ultrasonic stimulation. Moreover, TNT implants used in medical therapy have been demonstrated by various examples including dentistry, orthopedic implants, cardiovascular stents, and so on. Finally, a future perspective of TNTs for clinical applications is provided.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The modification of Ti substrate or TiO2 nanostructured layer for improving their functionality.Notes: (A) The surface modification of Ti disc implants by growth factor-releasing particles to enhance osseointegration. (B) TGF-β1-loaded Ti led to increases in bone-to-implant contact and bone volume within 1 mm macropores. (C) TEM image of antibacterial AgNPs incorporated within TNTs. (A) Reprinted from Shim IK, Chung HJ, Jung MR, et al. Biofunctional porous anodized titanium implants for enhanced bone regeneration. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2014;102A:3639–3648,111 with permission from John Wiley and Sons. (B) Reprinted from Adv Drug Deliv Rev, 59, Moioli EK, Clark PA, Xin X, Lal S, Mao JJ, Matrices and scaffolds for drug delivery in dental, oral and craniofacial tissue engineering, 308–324,113 Copyright (2007), with permission from Elsevier. (C) Reprinted from Biomaterials, 32, Zhao L, Wang H, Huo K, et al, Antibacterial nano-structured titania coating incorporated with silver nanoparticles 5706–5716,114 Copyright (2011), with permission from Elsevier.Abbreviations: AgNP, silver nanoparticle; TEM, transmission electron microscopy; TGF-β1, transforming growth factor-β1; TNT, titania nanotube.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036548&req=5

f11-ijn-11-4819: The modification of Ti substrate or TiO2 nanostructured layer for improving their functionality.Notes: (A) The surface modification of Ti disc implants by growth factor-releasing particles to enhance osseointegration. (B) TGF-β1-loaded Ti led to increases in bone-to-implant contact and bone volume within 1 mm macropores. (C) TEM image of antibacterial AgNPs incorporated within TNTs. (A) Reprinted from Shim IK, Chung HJ, Jung MR, et al. Biofunctional porous anodized titanium implants for enhanced bone regeneration. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2014;102A:3639–3648,111 with permission from John Wiley and Sons. (B) Reprinted from Adv Drug Deliv Rev, 59, Moioli EK, Clark PA, Xin X, Lal S, Mao JJ, Matrices and scaffolds for drug delivery in dental, oral and craniofacial tissue engineering, 308–324,113 Copyright (2007), with permission from Elsevier. (C) Reprinted from Biomaterials, 32, Zhao L, Wang H, Huo K, et al, Antibacterial nano-structured titania coating incorporated with silver nanoparticles 5706–5716,114 Copyright (2011), with permission from Elsevier.Abbreviations: AgNP, silver nanoparticle; TEM, transmission electron microscopy; TGF-β1, transforming growth factor-β1; TNT, titania nanotube.

Mentions: The implant surface is another important factor in terms of integration within the host body, given that it acts as an interface between artificial element and biological environment. Bovan et al highlighted the role of material surfaces in regulating cell response to implants, and the result demonstrated that the surface roughness and chemistry of bare orthopedic implants have a significant effect on osteoblasts and chondrocytes growth.109 Kunze et al reported that annealed TNT coatings with anatase phase are good precursors for the formation of calcium hydroxyapatite ceramic.110 In their study, more nuclei were formed on the TNT surface than on flat compact TiO2 in the initial stages of apatite growth, which demonstrated that TNTs are more beneficial to osseointegration than flat compact TiO2. Furthermore, Shim et al used Ti-anodized implants coated with FGF-2-loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles shown in Figure 11A for enhancing bone regeneration by an approach of the electrospray deposition, and the obtained results indicated that the factor-releasing particles fabricate stable and the releasing performance was extended over 2 weeks, thus enhancing the proliferation of bone tissues.111 It is known that some biologically active substances such as FGF, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor β and insulin-like growth factor could break inflammatory cell release.112 Moioli et al demonstrated that incorporation of growth factor β (transforming growth factor β) in TNTs led to significantly enhanced bone-to-implant contact and increased bone volume within the 1 mm macropores as compared to placebo controls as shown in Figure 11B.113 TNTs loaded with Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) possess a relatively long-term antibacterial ability and simultaneously promote cell functions, and AgNPs attached to the inner wall of the TNTs have a diameter of ~10–20 nm as shown in Figure 11C.114


TiO 2 nanotube platforms for smart drug delivery: a review
The modification of Ti substrate or TiO2 nanostructured layer for improving their functionality.Notes: (A) The surface modification of Ti disc implants by growth factor-releasing particles to enhance osseointegration. (B) TGF-β1-loaded Ti led to increases in bone-to-implant contact and bone volume within 1 mm macropores. (C) TEM image of antibacterial AgNPs incorporated within TNTs. (A) Reprinted from Shim IK, Chung HJ, Jung MR, et al. Biofunctional porous anodized titanium implants for enhanced bone regeneration. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2014;102A:3639–3648,111 with permission from John Wiley and Sons. (B) Reprinted from Adv Drug Deliv Rev, 59, Moioli EK, Clark PA, Xin X, Lal S, Mao JJ, Matrices and scaffolds for drug delivery in dental, oral and craniofacial tissue engineering, 308–324,113 Copyright (2007), with permission from Elsevier. (C) Reprinted from Biomaterials, 32, Zhao L, Wang H, Huo K, et al, Antibacterial nano-structured titania coating incorporated with silver nanoparticles 5706–5716,114 Copyright (2011), with permission from Elsevier.Abbreviations: AgNP, silver nanoparticle; TEM, transmission electron microscopy; TGF-β1, transforming growth factor-β1; TNT, titania nanotube.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036548&req=5

f11-ijn-11-4819: The modification of Ti substrate or TiO2 nanostructured layer for improving their functionality.Notes: (A) The surface modification of Ti disc implants by growth factor-releasing particles to enhance osseointegration. (B) TGF-β1-loaded Ti led to increases in bone-to-implant contact and bone volume within 1 mm macropores. (C) TEM image of antibacterial AgNPs incorporated within TNTs. (A) Reprinted from Shim IK, Chung HJ, Jung MR, et al. Biofunctional porous anodized titanium implants for enhanced bone regeneration. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2014;102A:3639–3648,111 with permission from John Wiley and Sons. (B) Reprinted from Adv Drug Deliv Rev, 59, Moioli EK, Clark PA, Xin X, Lal S, Mao JJ, Matrices and scaffolds for drug delivery in dental, oral and craniofacial tissue engineering, 308–324,113 Copyright (2007), with permission from Elsevier. (C) Reprinted from Biomaterials, 32, Zhao L, Wang H, Huo K, et al, Antibacterial nano-structured titania coating incorporated with silver nanoparticles 5706–5716,114 Copyright (2011), with permission from Elsevier.Abbreviations: AgNP, silver nanoparticle; TEM, transmission electron microscopy; TGF-β1, transforming growth factor-β1; TNT, titania nanotube.
Mentions: The implant surface is another important factor in terms of integration within the host body, given that it acts as an interface between artificial element and biological environment. Bovan et al highlighted the role of material surfaces in regulating cell response to implants, and the result demonstrated that the surface roughness and chemistry of bare orthopedic implants have a significant effect on osteoblasts and chondrocytes growth.109 Kunze et al reported that annealed TNT coatings with anatase phase are good precursors for the formation of calcium hydroxyapatite ceramic.110 In their study, more nuclei were formed on the TNT surface than on flat compact TiO2 in the initial stages of apatite growth, which demonstrated that TNTs are more beneficial to osseointegration than flat compact TiO2. Furthermore, Shim et al used Ti-anodized implants coated with FGF-2-loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles shown in Figure 11A for enhancing bone regeneration by an approach of the electrospray deposition, and the obtained results indicated that the factor-releasing particles fabricate stable and the releasing performance was extended over 2 weeks, thus enhancing the proliferation of bone tissues.111 It is known that some biologically active substances such as FGF, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor β and insulin-like growth factor could break inflammatory cell release.112 Moioli et al demonstrated that incorporation of growth factor β (transforming growth factor β) in TNTs led to significantly enhanced bone-to-implant contact and increased bone volume within the 1 mm macropores as compared to placebo controls as shown in Figure 11B.113 TNTs loaded with Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) possess a relatively long-term antibacterial ability and simultaneously promote cell functions, and AgNPs attached to the inner wall of the TNTs have a diameter of ~10–20 nm as shown in Figure 11C.114

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Titania nanotube (TNT) arrays are recognized as promising materials for localized drug delivery implants because of their excellent properties and facile preparation process. This review highlights the concept of localized drug delivery systems based on TNTs, considering their outstanding biocompatibility in a series of ex vivo and in vivo studies. Considering the safety of TNT implants in the host body, studies of the biocompatibility present significant importance for the clinical application of TNT implants. Toward smart TNT platforms for sustainable drug delivery, several advanced approaches were presented in this review, including controlled release triggered by temperature, light, radiofrequency magnetism, and ultrasonic stimulation. Moreover, TNT implants used in medical therapy have been demonstrated by various examples including dentistry, orthopedic implants, cardiovascular stents, and so on. Finally, a future perspective of TNTs for clinical applications is provided.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus