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Highly efficient in vitro biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Lysinibacillus sphaericus MR-1 and their characterization

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ABSTRACT

Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in diverse fields due to their superior properties. Currently the biosynthesis of AgNPs is in the limelight of modern nanotechnology because of its green properties. However, relatively low yield and inefficiency diminish the prospect of applying these biosynthesized AgNPs. In this work, a rapid mass AgNP biosynthesis method using the cell-free extract of a novel bacterial strain, Lysinibacillus sphaericus MR-1, which has been isolated from a chemical fertilizer plant, is reported. In addition, the optimum synthesis conditions of AgNPs were investigated. The optimum pH, temperature, dosage, and reaction time were 12, 70 °C, 20 mM AgNO3, and 75 min, respectively. Finally, AgNPs were characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy, zeta potential and size distribution analysis, x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results revealed that these biosynthesized AgNPs were bimolecular covered, stable, well-dispersed face centered cubic (fcc) spherical crystalline particles with diameters in the range 5–20 nm. The advantages of this approach are its simplicity, high efficiency, and eco-friendly and cost-effective features.

No MeSH data available.


(a) Overview TEM image of AgNPs biosynthesized using the cell-free extract of L. sphaericus MR-1, showing that the particles are well dispersed (scale bar: 200 nm). (b) Typical TEM image of as-biosynthesized AgNPs (scale bar: 20 nm). (c) Typical HRTEM image of a single AgNP (scale bar: 5 nm). (d) typical selected area electron diffraction pattern of AgNPs biosynthesized using the cell-free extract of L. sphaericus MR-1 (scale bar: 10 1/nm).
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Figure 8: (a) Overview TEM image of AgNPs biosynthesized using the cell-free extract of L. sphaericus MR-1, showing that the particles are well dispersed (scale bar: 200 nm). (b) Typical TEM image of as-biosynthesized AgNPs (scale bar: 20 nm). (c) Typical HRTEM image of a single AgNP (scale bar: 5 nm). (d) typical selected area electron diffraction pattern of AgNPs biosynthesized using the cell-free extract of L. sphaericus MR-1 (scale bar: 10 1/nm).

Mentions: An FESEM image of the AgNPs synthesized under optimum conditions using 20 mM of silver nitrate solution revealed that the particles were spherical and well dispersed and had diameters of 5–20 nm (figure 7(a)). The EDX spectrum (figure 7(b)) confirmed the formation of AgNPs. The presence of Cl may have come from the glass slides used for the EDX sample preparation. The HRTEM images (figure 8) further demonstrated the nature of AgNPs. The particle diameter was around 5–10 nm. The size seemed a little smaller than that revealed by the FESEM image and size distribution analysis, which might be explained as a result of the bimolecular coating on the AgNPs.


Highly efficient in vitro biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Lysinibacillus sphaericus MR-1 and their characterization
(a) Overview TEM image of AgNPs biosynthesized using the cell-free extract of L. sphaericus MR-1, showing that the particles are well dispersed (scale bar: 200 nm). (b) Typical TEM image of as-biosynthesized AgNPs (scale bar: 20 nm). (c) Typical HRTEM image of a single AgNP (scale bar: 5 nm). (d) typical selected area electron diffraction pattern of AgNPs biosynthesized using the cell-free extract of L. sphaericus MR-1 (scale bar: 10 1/nm).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036493&req=5

Figure 8: (a) Overview TEM image of AgNPs biosynthesized using the cell-free extract of L. sphaericus MR-1, showing that the particles are well dispersed (scale bar: 200 nm). (b) Typical TEM image of as-biosynthesized AgNPs (scale bar: 20 nm). (c) Typical HRTEM image of a single AgNP (scale bar: 5 nm). (d) typical selected area electron diffraction pattern of AgNPs biosynthesized using the cell-free extract of L. sphaericus MR-1 (scale bar: 10 1/nm).
Mentions: An FESEM image of the AgNPs synthesized under optimum conditions using 20 mM of silver nitrate solution revealed that the particles were spherical and well dispersed and had diameters of 5–20 nm (figure 7(a)). The EDX spectrum (figure 7(b)) confirmed the formation of AgNPs. The presence of Cl may have come from the glass slides used for the EDX sample preparation. The HRTEM images (figure 8) further demonstrated the nature of AgNPs. The particle diameter was around 5–10 nm. The size seemed a little smaller than that revealed by the FESEM image and size distribution analysis, which might be explained as a result of the bimolecular coating on the AgNPs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in diverse fields due to their superior properties. Currently the biosynthesis of AgNPs is in the limelight of modern nanotechnology because of its green properties. However, relatively low yield and inefficiency diminish the prospect of applying these biosynthesized AgNPs. In this work, a rapid mass AgNP biosynthesis method using the cell-free extract of a novel bacterial strain, Lysinibacillus sphaericus MR-1, which has been isolated from a chemical fertilizer plant, is reported. In addition, the optimum synthesis conditions of AgNPs were investigated. The optimum pH, temperature, dosage, and reaction time were 12, 70 °C, 20 mM AgNO3, and 75 min, respectively. Finally, AgNPs were characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy, zeta potential and size distribution analysis, x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results revealed that these biosynthesized AgNPs were bimolecular covered, stable, well-dispersed face centered cubic (fcc) spherical crystalline particles with diameters in the range 5–20 nm. The advantages of this approach are its simplicity, high efficiency, and eco-friendly and cost-effective features.

No MeSH data available.