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Nano and micro architectures for self-propelled motors

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Self-propelled micromotors are emerging as important tools that help us understand the fundamentals of motion at the microscale and the nanoscale. Development of the motors for various biomedical and environmental applications is being pursued. Multiple fabrication methods can be used to construct the geometries of different sizes of motors. Here, we present an overview of appropriate methods of fabrication according to both size and shape requirements and the concept of guiding the catalytic motors within the confines of wall. Micromotors have also been incorporated with biological systems for a new type of fabrication method for bioinspired hybrid motors using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printed hybrid and bioinspired motors can be propelled by using ultrasound or live cells, offering a more biocompatible approach when compared to traditional catalytic motors.

No MeSH data available.


Bat-shaped 3D printed polymer structure for the fabrication of a hybrid motor. Insert shows the schematic drawing of the shape.
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Figure 8: Bat-shaped 3D printed polymer structure for the fabrication of a hybrid motor. Insert shows the schematic drawing of the shape.

Mentions: The efficient use of energy and motion observed in living species and organisms provides valuable insight into the assembly of artificial motors. Contractile cell types, such as cardiomyocytes or skeletal muscles, offer the mechanical strength needed to power soft robotic systems [68]. These cells’ contractile motion can generate unified propulsion for novel biohybrid motors [64, 69]. The development of 3D printing techniques and materials has generated many opportunities to combine bioinspired architecture with contractile cells. To develop a new macroscale motor, we used a 3D printer to fabricate a winged structure using a flexible, biocompatible polymer. The final printed material is only 2.2 cm in length, and it resembles a bird or bat in its shape, as shown in figure 8. Skeletal muscle cultured on the 3D-printed material can offer a contractile force to propel the material through solution. With an externally applied voltage, the skeletal muscle will contract across the motor surface, pushing the motor forward. In mimicking biological systems, the biohybrid, 3D-printed motors illustrate how a complex behavior can be simplified and used to generate functional motion.


Nano and micro architectures for self-propelled motors
Bat-shaped 3D printed polymer structure for the fabrication of a hybrid motor. Insert shows the schematic drawing of the shape.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036491&req=5

Figure 8: Bat-shaped 3D printed polymer structure for the fabrication of a hybrid motor. Insert shows the schematic drawing of the shape.
Mentions: The efficient use of energy and motion observed in living species and organisms provides valuable insight into the assembly of artificial motors. Contractile cell types, such as cardiomyocytes or skeletal muscles, offer the mechanical strength needed to power soft robotic systems [68]. These cells’ contractile motion can generate unified propulsion for novel biohybrid motors [64, 69]. The development of 3D printing techniques and materials has generated many opportunities to combine bioinspired architecture with contractile cells. To develop a new macroscale motor, we used a 3D printer to fabricate a winged structure using a flexible, biocompatible polymer. The final printed material is only 2.2 cm in length, and it resembles a bird or bat in its shape, as shown in figure 8. Skeletal muscle cultured on the 3D-printed material can offer a contractile force to propel the material through solution. With an externally applied voltage, the skeletal muscle will contract across the motor surface, pushing the motor forward. In mimicking biological systems, the biohybrid, 3D-printed motors illustrate how a complex behavior can be simplified and used to generate functional motion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Self-propelled micromotors are emerging as important tools that help us understand the fundamentals of motion at the microscale and the nanoscale. Development of the motors for various biomedical and environmental applications is being pursued. Multiple fabrication methods can be used to construct the geometries of different sizes of motors. Here, we present an overview of appropriate methods of fabrication according to both size and shape requirements and the concept of guiding the catalytic motors within the confines of wall. Micromotors have also been incorporated with biological systems for a new type of fabrication method for bioinspired hybrid motors using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printed hybrid and bioinspired motors can be propelled by using ultrasound or live cells, offering a more biocompatible approach when compared to traditional catalytic motors.

No MeSH data available.