Limits...
Nano and micro architectures for self-propelled motors

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Self-propelled micromotors are emerging as important tools that help us understand the fundamentals of motion at the microscale and the nanoscale. Development of the motors for various biomedical and environmental applications is being pursued. Multiple fabrication methods can be used to construct the geometries of different sizes of motors. Here, we present an overview of appropriate methods of fabrication according to both size and shape requirements and the concept of guiding the catalytic motors within the confines of wall. Micromotors have also been incorporated with biological systems for a new type of fabrication method for bioinspired hybrid motors using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printed hybrid and bioinspired motors can be propelled by using ultrasound or live cells, offering a more biocompatible approach when compared to traditional catalytic motors.

No MeSH data available.


Active artificial sperm. Turn of an acoustically activated sperm-swimmer. (a) No acoustic stimulus. (b) Acoustic energy present in the system felt by the sperm-swimmer. (c)–(e) Sperm-swimmer makes a turn of 180°. (f) Final position.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036491&req=5

Figure 7: Active artificial sperm. Turn of an acoustically activated sperm-swimmer. (a) No acoustic stimulus. (b) Acoustic energy present in the system felt by the sperm-swimmer. (c)–(e) Sperm-swimmer makes a turn of 180°. (f) Final position.

Mentions: The nodal fields generated by the acoustic energy activate the sperm and make it move (figure 7). The motion and directionality of the swimmer is dependent on the location of the head [67]. If the head occupies a high-pressure area, the sperm migrates to a low-pressure area. The flexible tail gives an associated drag force that allows the sperm-swimmer to navigate through different high-pressure areas.


Nano and micro architectures for self-propelled motors
Active artificial sperm. Turn of an acoustically activated sperm-swimmer. (a) No acoustic stimulus. (b) Acoustic energy present in the system felt by the sperm-swimmer. (c)–(e) Sperm-swimmer makes a turn of 180°. (f) Final position.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036491&req=5

Figure 7: Active artificial sperm. Turn of an acoustically activated sperm-swimmer. (a) No acoustic stimulus. (b) Acoustic energy present in the system felt by the sperm-swimmer. (c)–(e) Sperm-swimmer makes a turn of 180°. (f) Final position.
Mentions: The nodal fields generated by the acoustic energy activate the sperm and make it move (figure 7). The motion and directionality of the swimmer is dependent on the location of the head [67]. If the head occupies a high-pressure area, the sperm migrates to a low-pressure area. The flexible tail gives an associated drag force that allows the sperm-swimmer to navigate through different high-pressure areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Self-propelled micromotors are emerging as important tools that help us understand the fundamentals of motion at the microscale and the nanoscale. Development of the motors for various biomedical and environmental applications is being pursued. Multiple fabrication methods can be used to construct the geometries of different sizes of motors. Here, we present an overview of appropriate methods of fabrication according to both size and shape requirements and the concept of guiding the catalytic motors within the confines of wall. Micromotors have also been incorporated with biological systems for a new type of fabrication method for bioinspired hybrid motors using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printed hybrid and bioinspired motors can be propelled by using ultrasound or live cells, offering a more biocompatible approach when compared to traditional catalytic motors.

No MeSH data available.