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Nano and micro architectures for self-propelled motors

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Self-propelled micromotors are emerging as important tools that help us understand the fundamentals of motion at the microscale and the nanoscale. Development of the motors for various biomedical and environmental applications is being pursued. Multiple fabrication methods can be used to construct the geometries of different sizes of motors. Here, we present an overview of appropriate methods of fabrication according to both size and shape requirements and the concept of guiding the catalytic motors within the confines of wall. Micromotors have also been incorporated with biological systems for a new type of fabrication method for bioinspired hybrid motors using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printed hybrid and bioinspired motors can be propelled by using ultrasound or live cells, offering a more biocompatible approach when compared to traditional catalytic motors.

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Roll-up fabrication of microjets and self-propulsion. (a) 200 μm-long rolled-up microtube on a patterned glass substrate. (b) Microtubes self-propelling in 10% H2O2 fuel.
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Figure 5: Roll-up fabrication of microjets and self-propulsion. (a) 200 μm-long rolled-up microtube on a patterned glass substrate. (b) Microtubes self-propelling in 10% H2O2 fuel.

Mentions: The micromotors have an active catalyst as their top inner layers. The catalyst decomposes the chemical fuels present in the media, and the reaction produces bubbles, which act as propulsion force. Figure 5 shows micromotors fabricated using rolling-up technology and containing Pt as a catalyst, moving in 10% H2O2 solution. The micromotor has a length of 200 μm and contains three layers of metals deposited at different rates: Fe, 0.8 nm s−1; Fe, 0.3 nm s−1; and Pt, 0.09 nm sec−1. So far, we found roll-up microjets only of 25 μm, 50 μm, and 500 μm in length in previous reports.


Nano and micro architectures for self-propelled motors
Roll-up fabrication of microjets and self-propulsion. (a) 200 μm-long rolled-up microtube on a patterned glass substrate. (b) Microtubes self-propelling in 10% H2O2 fuel.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036491&req=5

Figure 5: Roll-up fabrication of microjets and self-propulsion. (a) 200 μm-long rolled-up microtube on a patterned glass substrate. (b) Microtubes self-propelling in 10% H2O2 fuel.
Mentions: The micromotors have an active catalyst as their top inner layers. The catalyst decomposes the chemical fuels present in the media, and the reaction produces bubbles, which act as propulsion force. Figure 5 shows micromotors fabricated using rolling-up technology and containing Pt as a catalyst, moving in 10% H2O2 solution. The micromotor has a length of 200 μm and contains three layers of metals deposited at different rates: Fe, 0.8 nm s−1; Fe, 0.3 nm s−1; and Pt, 0.09 nm sec−1. So far, we found roll-up microjets only of 25 μm, 50 μm, and 500 μm in length in previous reports.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Self-propelled micromotors are emerging as important tools that help us understand the fundamentals of motion at the microscale and the nanoscale. Development of the motors for various biomedical and environmental applications is being pursued. Multiple fabrication methods can be used to construct the geometries of different sizes of motors. Here, we present an overview of appropriate methods of fabrication according to both size and shape requirements and the concept of guiding the catalytic motors within the confines of wall. Micromotors have also been incorporated with biological systems for a new type of fabrication method for bioinspired hybrid motors using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printed hybrid and bioinspired motors can be propelled by using ultrasound or live cells, offering a more biocompatible approach when compared to traditional catalytic motors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus