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Nano and micro architectures for self-propelled motors

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Self-propelled micromotors are emerging as important tools that help us understand the fundamentals of motion at the microscale and the nanoscale. Development of the motors for various biomedical and environmental applications is being pursued. Multiple fabrication methods can be used to construct the geometries of different sizes of motors. Here, we present an overview of appropriate methods of fabrication according to both size and shape requirements and the concept of guiding the catalytic motors within the confines of wall. Micromotors have also been incorporated with biological systems for a new type of fabrication method for bioinspired hybrid motors using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printed hybrid and bioinspired motors can be propelled by using ultrasound or live cells, offering a more biocompatible approach when compared to traditional catalytic motors.

No MeSH data available.


Fabrication and self-propulsion of electrochemical microjets. (a) SEM image of PEDOT-Pt tubes grown on gold film (the polycarbonate membrane is dissolved). (b) SEM image of a single tube. (c) PEDOT-Pt tubes in H2O2 that are propelled due to continuous bubble release. The trail of bubbles is clearly visible. Red circles indicate the tubes.
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Figure 3: Fabrication and self-propulsion of electrochemical microjets. (a) SEM image of PEDOT-Pt tubes grown on gold film (the polycarbonate membrane is dissolved). (b) SEM image of a single tube. (c) PEDOT-Pt tubes in H2O2 that are propelled due to continuous bubble release. The trail of bubbles is clearly visible. Red circles indicate the tubes.

Mentions: The electrodepositing procedure detailed in [50] involves the use of a polycarbonate membrane with 2 μm-diameter pores to guide the growth of the tubes. This membrane is coated on one side with 75 nm of gold, which acts as a working electrode. An Ag/AgCl electrode is used as a reference, and a platinum wire serves as the counterelectrode. First, a polymer layer is deposited from a solution containing 15 mM EDOT, 7.5 mM KNO3, and 100 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), which is a conducting polymer, serves as the outer layer of these microtubes, and subsequent layers of metals are deposited on the PEDOT layer. Owing to the solvophobic and electrostatic effects [54], the PEDOT preferentially grows along the surface of the membrane and not as a rod in the pores. To make these tubes catalytically active, a layer of platinum is deposited on the PEDOT from a platinum-plating solution. After this, the gold layer is scratched off by hand polishing against alumina slurry, and the membrane is dissolved in a methylene chloride solution (figure 3(a)). The suspended PEDOT/Pt tubes are subsequently washed in ethanol and collected and stored in water. Figure 3(b) shows a single PEDOT/Pt microtube.


Nano and micro architectures for self-propelled motors
Fabrication and self-propulsion of electrochemical microjets. (a) SEM image of PEDOT-Pt tubes grown on gold film (the polycarbonate membrane is dissolved). (b) SEM image of a single tube. (c) PEDOT-Pt tubes in H2O2 that are propelled due to continuous bubble release. The trail of bubbles is clearly visible. Red circles indicate the tubes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036491&req=5

Figure 3: Fabrication and self-propulsion of electrochemical microjets. (a) SEM image of PEDOT-Pt tubes grown on gold film (the polycarbonate membrane is dissolved). (b) SEM image of a single tube. (c) PEDOT-Pt tubes in H2O2 that are propelled due to continuous bubble release. The trail of bubbles is clearly visible. Red circles indicate the tubes.
Mentions: The electrodepositing procedure detailed in [50] involves the use of a polycarbonate membrane with 2 μm-diameter pores to guide the growth of the tubes. This membrane is coated on one side with 75 nm of gold, which acts as a working electrode. An Ag/AgCl electrode is used as a reference, and a platinum wire serves as the counterelectrode. First, a polymer layer is deposited from a solution containing 15 mM EDOT, 7.5 mM KNO3, and 100 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), which is a conducting polymer, serves as the outer layer of these microtubes, and subsequent layers of metals are deposited on the PEDOT layer. Owing to the solvophobic and electrostatic effects [54], the PEDOT preferentially grows along the surface of the membrane and not as a rod in the pores. To make these tubes catalytically active, a layer of platinum is deposited on the PEDOT from a platinum-plating solution. After this, the gold layer is scratched off by hand polishing against alumina slurry, and the membrane is dissolved in a methylene chloride solution (figure 3(a)). The suspended PEDOT/Pt tubes are subsequently washed in ethanol and collected and stored in water. Figure 3(b) shows a single PEDOT/Pt microtube.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Self-propelled micromotors are emerging as important tools that help us understand the fundamentals of motion at the microscale and the nanoscale. Development of the motors for various biomedical and environmental applications is being pursued. Multiple fabrication methods can be used to construct the geometries of different sizes of motors. Here, we present an overview of appropriate methods of fabrication according to both size and shape requirements and the concept of guiding the catalytic motors within the confines of wall. Micromotors have also been incorporated with biological systems for a new type of fabrication method for bioinspired hybrid motors using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printed hybrid and bioinspired motors can be propelled by using ultrasound or live cells, offering a more biocompatible approach when compared to traditional catalytic motors.

No MeSH data available.