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Nano and micro architectures for self-propelled motors

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Self-propelled micromotors are emerging as important tools that help us understand the fundamentals of motion at the microscale and the nanoscale. Development of the motors for various biomedical and environmental applications is being pursued. Multiple fabrication methods can be used to construct the geometries of different sizes of motors. Here, we present an overview of appropriate methods of fabrication according to both size and shape requirements and the concept of guiding the catalytic motors within the confines of wall. Micromotors have also been incorporated with biological systems for a new type of fabrication method for bioinspired hybrid motors using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printed hybrid and bioinspired motors can be propelled by using ultrasound or live cells, offering a more biocompatible approach when compared to traditional catalytic motors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Wall guiding of Janus micromotors. (a) SEM image of Pt-capped Janus particle (5 μm diameter) close to the 1 μm-high glass wall, and (b) the trajectory, along with the wall they are following.
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Figure 2: Wall guiding of Janus micromotors. (a) SEM image of Pt-capped Janus particle (5 μm diameter) close to the 1 μm-high glass wall, and (b) the trajectory, along with the wall they are following.

Mentions: To achieve force-free particle guidance, we adopted the wall-guiding strategy and designed the walls to guide the particle’s motion. An obvious approach is the use of high walls that limit the fluid flow, and therefore restrict the accessible area for the micromotors, as shown by Baraban et al for particles and tubes [47]; the same group achieved active micromotor trapping in microfluidic chips [49]. We observed that particles feel walls and steps, and preferentially move along the walls until they encounter an obstacle or another stimulus. To design these walls, we considered the existence of an attraction potential between the particle and the wall, so that the particle cannot escape due to rotational diffusion. Figure 2 shows an example of Pt-capped Janus particles (5 μm in diameter) that approach a 1 μm-high glass wall and follow it. In some of the experiments, the particle even overcame a gap between two walls without significant deviation. An SEM image gives a more detailed view of the particle close to the wall architecture. Further work on this topic is underway in our laboratory.


Nano and micro architectures for self-propelled motors
Wall guiding of Janus micromotors. (a) SEM image of Pt-capped Janus particle (5 μm diameter) close to the 1 μm-high glass wall, and (b) the trajectory, along with the wall they are following.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036491&req=5

Figure 2: Wall guiding of Janus micromotors. (a) SEM image of Pt-capped Janus particle (5 μm diameter) close to the 1 μm-high glass wall, and (b) the trajectory, along with the wall they are following.
Mentions: To achieve force-free particle guidance, we adopted the wall-guiding strategy and designed the walls to guide the particle’s motion. An obvious approach is the use of high walls that limit the fluid flow, and therefore restrict the accessible area for the micromotors, as shown by Baraban et al for particles and tubes [47]; the same group achieved active micromotor trapping in microfluidic chips [49]. We observed that particles feel walls and steps, and preferentially move along the walls until they encounter an obstacle or another stimulus. To design these walls, we considered the existence of an attraction potential between the particle and the wall, so that the particle cannot escape due to rotational diffusion. Figure 2 shows an example of Pt-capped Janus particles (5 μm in diameter) that approach a 1 μm-high glass wall and follow it. In some of the experiments, the particle even overcame a gap between two walls without significant deviation. An SEM image gives a more detailed view of the particle close to the wall architecture. Further work on this topic is underway in our laboratory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Self-propelled micromotors are emerging as important tools that help us understand the fundamentals of motion at the microscale and the nanoscale. Development of the motors for various biomedical and environmental applications is being pursued. Multiple fabrication methods can be used to construct the geometries of different sizes of motors. Here, we present an overview of appropriate methods of fabrication according to both size and shape requirements and the concept of guiding the catalytic motors within the confines of wall. Micromotors have also been incorporated with biological systems for a new type of fabrication method for bioinspired hybrid motors using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printed hybrid and bioinspired motors can be propelled by using ultrasound or live cells, offering a more biocompatible approach when compared to traditional catalytic motors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus