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Nano and micro architectures for self-propelled motors

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Self-propelled micromotors are emerging as important tools that help us understand the fundamentals of motion at the microscale and the nanoscale. Development of the motors for various biomedical and environmental applications is being pursued. Multiple fabrication methods can be used to construct the geometries of different sizes of motors. Here, we present an overview of appropriate methods of fabrication according to both size and shape requirements and the concept of guiding the catalytic motors within the confines of wall. Micromotors have also been incorporated with biological systems for a new type of fabrication method for bioinspired hybrid motors using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printed hybrid and bioinspired motors can be propelled by using ultrasound or live cells, offering a more biocompatible approach when compared to traditional catalytic motors.

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Fabrication and motion of Janus SiO2 nanospheres. (a) Scanning electron microscope images of a Janus SiO2 nanosphere with Pt (3 nm), and (b) their trajectory tracking, both with and without H2O2 fuel. Left to right: Janus SiO2 nanospheres of 125 nm, 330 nm, and 650 nm.
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Figure 1: Fabrication and motion of Janus SiO2 nanospheres. (a) Scanning electron microscope images of a Janus SiO2 nanosphere with Pt (3 nm), and (b) their trajectory tracking, both with and without H2O2 fuel. Left to right: Janus SiO2 nanospheres of 125 nm, 330 nm, and 650 nm.

Mentions: The obtained Janus spheres are collected by sonication and are then suspended in distilled water. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of figure 1(a) show that three different sizes of spherical Janus particles half-coated with Pt were successfully obtained. The motion of these Janus nanoparticles was observed by optical microscopy, and their trajectories were tracked by ImageJ software (figure 1(b)). With a decrease in size, the influence of Brownian force becomes stronger, as indicated by the black trajectories without any presence of H2O2. However, with the addition of H2O2 fuel, the random motion of the Janus nanoparticles covers a broader range, as indicated by the red trajectories, suggesting self-propulsion of these Janus nanomotors, driven by catalytic reaction. According to previous research on microsized spherical Janus motors, such active motion is highly possible due to the self-diffusiophoresis mechanism that results from the solute gradient by the Pt-triggered decomposition of H2O2 on only one side of the Janus particles. Further research will focus on how to realize effective guidance of the self-propelling Janus nanomotors, allowing them to achieve directional motion in a controlled manner.


Nano and micro architectures for self-propelled motors
Fabrication and motion of Janus SiO2 nanospheres. (a) Scanning electron microscope images of a Janus SiO2 nanosphere with Pt (3 nm), and (b) their trajectory tracking, both with and without H2O2 fuel. Left to right: Janus SiO2 nanospheres of 125 nm, 330 nm, and 650 nm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036491&req=5

Figure 1: Fabrication and motion of Janus SiO2 nanospheres. (a) Scanning electron microscope images of a Janus SiO2 nanosphere with Pt (3 nm), and (b) their trajectory tracking, both with and without H2O2 fuel. Left to right: Janus SiO2 nanospheres of 125 nm, 330 nm, and 650 nm.
Mentions: The obtained Janus spheres are collected by sonication and are then suspended in distilled water. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of figure 1(a) show that three different sizes of spherical Janus particles half-coated with Pt were successfully obtained. The motion of these Janus nanoparticles was observed by optical microscopy, and their trajectories were tracked by ImageJ software (figure 1(b)). With a decrease in size, the influence of Brownian force becomes stronger, as indicated by the black trajectories without any presence of H2O2. However, with the addition of H2O2 fuel, the random motion of the Janus nanoparticles covers a broader range, as indicated by the red trajectories, suggesting self-propulsion of these Janus nanomotors, driven by catalytic reaction. According to previous research on microsized spherical Janus motors, such active motion is highly possible due to the self-diffusiophoresis mechanism that results from the solute gradient by the Pt-triggered decomposition of H2O2 on only one side of the Janus particles. Further research will focus on how to realize effective guidance of the self-propelling Janus nanomotors, allowing them to achieve directional motion in a controlled manner.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Self-propelled micromotors are emerging as important tools that help us understand the fundamentals of motion at the microscale and the nanoscale. Development of the motors for various biomedical and environmental applications is being pursued. Multiple fabrication methods can be used to construct the geometries of different sizes of motors. Here, we present an overview of appropriate methods of fabrication according to both size and shape requirements and the concept of guiding the catalytic motors within the confines of wall. Micromotors have also been incorporated with biological systems for a new type of fabrication method for bioinspired hybrid motors using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printed hybrid and bioinspired motors can be propelled by using ultrasound or live cells, offering a more biocompatible approach when compared to traditional catalytic motors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus