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High-sensitivity piezoelectric perovskites for magnetoelectric composites

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A highly topical set of perovskite oxides are high-sensitivity piezoelectric ones, among which Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 at the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) between ferroelectric rhombohedral and tetragonal polymorphic phases is reckoned a case study. Piezoelectric ceramics are used in a wide range of mature, electromechanical transduction technologies like piezoelectric sensors, actuators and ultrasound generation, to name only a few examples, and more recently for demonstrating novel applications like magnetoelectric composites. In this case, piezoelectric perovskites are combined with magnetostrictive materials to provide magnetoelectricity as a product property of the piezoelectricity and piezomagnetism of the component phases. Interfaces play a key issue, for they control the mechanical coupling between the piezoresponsive phases. We present here main results of our investigation on the suitability of the high sensitivity MPB piezoelectric perovskite BiScO3–PbTiO3 in combination with ferrimagnetic spinel oxides for magnetoelectric composites. Emphasis has been put on the processing at low temperature to control reactions and interdiffusion between the two oxides. The role of the grain size effects is extensively addressed.

No MeSH data available.


Ferroelectric hysteresis loops and current density curves with increasing applied electric fields for trilayers prepared at 900 °C with ferrites obtained by (a) wet-chemistry and (b) mechanochemical activation.
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Figure 8: Ferroelectric hysteresis loops and current density curves with increasing applied electric fields for trilayers prepared at 900 °C with ferrites obtained by (a) wet-chemistry and (b) mechanochemical activation.

Mentions: The ferroelectric hysteresis loops are typically good indicators of the ability for poling a ferroelectric material, and therefore useful to validate the achievement of an effective poling in the multilayer composites. It should be mentioned that the hysteresis loops usually reported for laminate composites with a direct bonding between the component phases resembles that of a lossy dielectric material with leakage currents [29]. Figure 8(a) shows the P–E curves along with their current density curves with increasing the applied fields up to 5 kV mm−1, for the trilayer prepared at 900 °C with the ferrite by wet-chemistry. This field amplitude is high enough to achieve a square loop and saturation of polarization, from which Pr of ∼35 μC cm−2 resulted. The field evolution of the curves holds a strong resemblance with the typical ones of BSPT ceramics, for which a maximum Pr of ∼40 μC cm−2 was achieved (see figure 3), indicating that the ferrite sandwiched between two perovskites behaves as a good conductive material, and highlighting the high quality of the interfaces achieved.


High-sensitivity piezoelectric perovskites for magnetoelectric composites
Ferroelectric hysteresis loops and current density curves with increasing applied electric fields for trilayers prepared at 900 °C with ferrites obtained by (a) wet-chemistry and (b) mechanochemical activation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036485&req=5

Figure 8: Ferroelectric hysteresis loops and current density curves with increasing applied electric fields for trilayers prepared at 900 °C with ferrites obtained by (a) wet-chemistry and (b) mechanochemical activation.
Mentions: The ferroelectric hysteresis loops are typically good indicators of the ability for poling a ferroelectric material, and therefore useful to validate the achievement of an effective poling in the multilayer composites. It should be mentioned that the hysteresis loops usually reported for laminate composites with a direct bonding between the component phases resembles that of a lossy dielectric material with leakage currents [29]. Figure 8(a) shows the P–E curves along with their current density curves with increasing the applied fields up to 5 kV mm−1, for the trilayer prepared at 900 °C with the ferrite by wet-chemistry. This field amplitude is high enough to achieve a square loop and saturation of polarization, from which Pr of ∼35 μC cm−2 resulted. The field evolution of the curves holds a strong resemblance with the typical ones of BSPT ceramics, for which a maximum Pr of ∼40 μC cm−2 was achieved (see figure 3), indicating that the ferrite sandwiched between two perovskites behaves as a good conductive material, and highlighting the high quality of the interfaces achieved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A highly topical set of perovskite oxides are high-sensitivity piezoelectric ones, among which Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 at the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) between ferroelectric rhombohedral and tetragonal polymorphic phases is reckoned a case study. Piezoelectric ceramics are used in a wide range of mature, electromechanical transduction technologies like piezoelectric sensors, actuators and ultrasound generation, to name only a few examples, and more recently for demonstrating novel applications like magnetoelectric composites. In this case, piezoelectric perovskites are combined with magnetostrictive materials to provide magnetoelectricity as a product property of the piezoelectricity and piezomagnetism of the component phases. Interfaces play a key issue, for they control the mechanical coupling between the piezoresponsive phases. We present here main results of our investigation on the suitability of the high sensitivity MPB piezoelectric perovskite BiScO3–PbTiO3 in combination with ferrimagnetic spinel oxides for magnetoelectric composites. Emphasis has been put on the processing at low temperature to control reactions and interdiffusion between the two oxides. The role of the grain size effects is extensively addressed.

No MeSH data available.