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Recent progress on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, surface functional strategies and biomedical applications

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ABSTRACT

This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in the preparation, microstructure, and magnetic properties of bare and surface functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs); their corresponding biological application was also discussed. In order to implement the practical in vivo or in vitro applications, the IONPs must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of IONPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The new functionalized strategies, problems and major challenges, along with the current directions for the synthesis, surface functionalization and bioapplication of IONPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and the prospects in these research areas are also discussed.

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Metal–oleate precursors were prepared from the reaction of metal chlorides and sodium oleate. The thermal decomposition of the metal–oleate precursors in the high boiling solvent produced monodisperse nanocrystals (a). (Reprinted with permission from J Park et al 2004 Nat. Mater.3 891. Copyright 2004 Nature Publishing Group.) Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 nm-sized air-oxidized IONPs showing the one nanometer level increments in diameter (b). (Reprinted with permission from J Park et al 2005 Angew. Chem. Int. Edn44 2872. Copyright 2005 John Wiley and Sons.)
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Figure 5: Metal–oleate precursors were prepared from the reaction of metal chlorides and sodium oleate. The thermal decomposition of the metal–oleate precursors in the high boiling solvent produced monodisperse nanocrystals (a). (Reprinted with permission from J Park et al 2004 Nat. Mater.3 891. Copyright 2004 Nature Publishing Group.) Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 nm-sized air-oxidized IONPs showing the one nanometer level increments in diameter (b). (Reprinted with permission from J Park et al 2005 Angew. Chem. Int. Edn44 2872. Copyright 2005 John Wiley and Sons.)

Mentions: As shown in figure 5, Hyeon et al have reported a synthetic method of obtaining monodisperse IONPs by using inexpensive and nontoxic iron chloride rather than toxic and expensive iron pentacarbonyl. An organic solvent dispersion containing the iron–oleate complex and a surfactant was slowly heated to the boiling point of the solvent to produce monodisperse IONPs. In a single reaction, as much as 40 g of monodisperse IONPs was generated without any size-selection process [41]. The size of the IONPs was controlled by changing the aging temperature and other parameters. This concept of continuous growth without additional nucleation could be applicable to other materials, and the synthetic procedure is highly reproducible.


Recent progress on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, surface functional strategies and biomedical applications
Metal–oleate precursors were prepared from the reaction of metal chlorides and sodium oleate. The thermal decomposition of the metal–oleate precursors in the high boiling solvent produced monodisperse nanocrystals (a). (Reprinted with permission from J Park et al 2004 Nat. Mater.3 891. Copyright 2004 Nature Publishing Group.) Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 nm-sized air-oxidized IONPs showing the one nanometer level increments in diameter (b). (Reprinted with permission from J Park et al 2005 Angew. Chem. Int. Edn44 2872. Copyright 2005 John Wiley and Sons.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036481&req=5

Figure 5: Metal–oleate precursors were prepared from the reaction of metal chlorides and sodium oleate. The thermal decomposition of the metal–oleate precursors in the high boiling solvent produced monodisperse nanocrystals (a). (Reprinted with permission from J Park et al 2004 Nat. Mater.3 891. Copyright 2004 Nature Publishing Group.) Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 nm-sized air-oxidized IONPs showing the one nanometer level increments in diameter (b). (Reprinted with permission from J Park et al 2005 Angew. Chem. Int. Edn44 2872. Copyright 2005 John Wiley and Sons.)
Mentions: As shown in figure 5, Hyeon et al have reported a synthetic method of obtaining monodisperse IONPs by using inexpensive and nontoxic iron chloride rather than toxic and expensive iron pentacarbonyl. An organic solvent dispersion containing the iron–oleate complex and a surfactant was slowly heated to the boiling point of the solvent to produce monodisperse IONPs. In a single reaction, as much as 40 g of monodisperse IONPs was generated without any size-selection process [41]. The size of the IONPs was controlled by changing the aging temperature and other parameters. This concept of continuous growth without additional nucleation could be applicable to other materials, and the synthetic procedure is highly reproducible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in the preparation, microstructure, and magnetic properties of bare and surface functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs); their corresponding biological application was also discussed. In order to implement the practical in vivo or in vitro applications, the IONPs must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of IONPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The new functionalized strategies, problems and major challenges, along with the current directions for the synthesis, surface functionalization and bioapplication of IONPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and the prospects in these research areas are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus