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Anisotropic multi-step etching for large-area fabrication of surface microstructures on stainless steel to control thermal radiation

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Controlling the thermal radiation spectra of materials is one of the promising ways to advance energy system efficiency. It is well known that the thermal radiation spectrum can be controlled through the introduction of periodic surface microstructures. Herein, a method for the large-area fabrication of periodic microstructures based on multi-step wet etching is described. The method consists of three main steps, i.e., resist mask fabrication via photolithography, electrochemical wet etching, and side wall protection. Using this method, high-aspect micro-holes (0.82 aspect ratio) arrayed with hexagonal symmetry were fabricated on a stainless steel substrate. The conventional wet etching process method typically provides an aspect ratio of 0.3. The optical absorption peak attributed to the fabricated micro-hole array appeared at 0.8 μm, and the peak absorbance exceeded 0.8 for the micro-holes with a 0.82 aspect ratio. While argon plasma etching in a vacuum chamber was used in the present study for the formation of the protective layer, atmospheric plasma etching should be possible and will expand the applicability of this new method for the large-area fabrication of high-aspect materials.

No MeSH data available.


Etched depth of the micro-holes as a function of total etched volume. The black squares, blue circles, and red triangles indicate samples fabricated by single-step etching, multi-step etching, and multi-step etching with SiO2 interlayer, respectively.
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Figure 3: Etched depth of the micro-holes as a function of total etched volume. The black squares, blue circles, and red triangles indicate samples fabricated by single-step etching, multi-step etching, and multi-step etching with SiO2 interlayer, respectively.

Mentions: The multi-step wet etchings explained above are conducted for a 5 cm diameter stainless steel substrate. As shown in figure 3, depth of micro-holes increases with total etched volume according to the following formula:1where m is atomic weight, e is elementary charge, v is valence of the ion, ρ is density, te is etching time, and I is measured current.


Anisotropic multi-step etching for large-area fabrication of surface microstructures on stainless steel to control thermal radiation
Etched depth of the micro-holes as a function of total etched volume. The black squares, blue circles, and red triangles indicate samples fabricated by single-step etching, multi-step etching, and multi-step etching with SiO2 interlayer, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036480&req=5

Figure 3: Etched depth of the micro-holes as a function of total etched volume. The black squares, blue circles, and red triangles indicate samples fabricated by single-step etching, multi-step etching, and multi-step etching with SiO2 interlayer, respectively.
Mentions: The multi-step wet etchings explained above are conducted for a 5 cm diameter stainless steel substrate. As shown in figure 3, depth of micro-holes increases with total etched volume according to the following formula:1where m is atomic weight, e is elementary charge, v is valence of the ion, ρ is density, te is etching time, and I is measured current.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Controlling the thermal radiation spectra of materials is one of the promising ways to advance energy system efficiency. It is well known that the thermal radiation spectrum can be controlled through the introduction of periodic surface microstructures. Herein, a method for the large-area fabrication of periodic microstructures based on multi-step wet etching is described. The method consists of three main steps, i.e., resist mask fabrication via photolithography, electrochemical wet etching, and side wall protection. Using this method, high-aspect micro-holes (0.82 aspect ratio) arrayed with hexagonal symmetry were fabricated on a stainless steel substrate. The conventional wet etching process method typically provides an aspect ratio of 0.3. The optical absorption peak attributed to the fabricated micro-hole array appeared at 0.8 μm, and the peak absorbance exceeded 0.8 for the micro-holes with a 0.82 aspect ratio. While argon plasma etching in a vacuum chamber was used in the present study for the formation of the protective layer, atmospheric plasma etching should be possible and will expand the applicability of this new method for the large-area fabrication of high-aspect materials.

No MeSH data available.