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Non-covalent polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes and the role of wrapped polymers as functional dispersants

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ABSTRACT

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been recognized as a promising material in a wide range of applications from biotechnology to energy-related devices. However, the poor solubility in aqueous and organic solvents hindered the applications of CNTs. As studies have progressed, the methodology for CNT dispersion was established. In this methodology, the key issue is to covalently or non-covalently functionalize the surfaces of the CNTs with a dispersant. Among the various types of dispersions, polymer wrapping through non-covalent interactions is attractive in terms of the stability and homogeneity of the functionalization. Recently, by taking advantage of their stability, the wrapped-polymers have been utilized to support and/or reinforce the unique functionality of the CNTs, leading to the development of high-performance devices. In this review, various polymer wrapping approaches, together with the applications of the polymer-wrapped CNTs, are summarized.

No MeSH data available.


Structure of SWCNTs modified by polymeric PEG. Reprinted with permission from A J Andersen et al 2013 ACS Nano7 1108. Copyright 2013 American Chemical Society.
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Figure 25: Structure of SWCNTs modified by polymeric PEG. Reprinted with permission from A J Andersen et al 2013 ACS Nano7 1108. Copyright 2013 American Chemical Society.

Mentions: One of the most successful examples in this field is the series of excellent works explored by Liu et al [298, 299]. They wrapped SWCNTs with a PEG-functionalized phospholipid (PEG-PL) and successfully achieved a long blood circulation [285, 300]. By taking advantage of the unique optical properties of non-oxidized SWCNTs, they successfully realized NIR- [301–303] and Raman [304] imaging of the tumor [302, 305] and vessels [303, 306, 307] in vivo using PEG-PL/SWCNT. Furthermore, PEG-PL/SWCNT was used as the platform for 1) ligand functionalization for targeting [308], 2) a photo-thermal molecular heater to treat cancer cells and 3) labeling for radio-active imaging (figure 24(b)) [309]. Importantly, SWCNTs wrapped by polymeric PEG synthesized based on the PEGylation of poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene) (figure 25) showed a much longer blood circulation half-life than that of PEG-PL/SWCNT due to the pronounced PEG loading [300, 310]. While the packing density of PEG coatings immobilized on PEG-PL/SWCNT with single anchoring points is limited by steric hindrance, polymeric PEG allows continuous binding of the polymer onto the SWCNT surface, yielding a highly dense PEG coating.


Non-covalent polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes and the role of wrapped polymers as functional dispersants
Structure of SWCNTs modified by polymeric PEG. Reprinted with permission from A J Andersen et al 2013 ACS Nano7 1108. Copyright 2013 American Chemical Society.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036478&req=5

Figure 25: Structure of SWCNTs modified by polymeric PEG. Reprinted with permission from A J Andersen et al 2013 ACS Nano7 1108. Copyright 2013 American Chemical Society.
Mentions: One of the most successful examples in this field is the series of excellent works explored by Liu et al [298, 299]. They wrapped SWCNTs with a PEG-functionalized phospholipid (PEG-PL) and successfully achieved a long blood circulation [285, 300]. By taking advantage of the unique optical properties of non-oxidized SWCNTs, they successfully realized NIR- [301–303] and Raman [304] imaging of the tumor [302, 305] and vessels [303, 306, 307] in vivo using PEG-PL/SWCNT. Furthermore, PEG-PL/SWCNT was used as the platform for 1) ligand functionalization for targeting [308], 2) a photo-thermal molecular heater to treat cancer cells and 3) labeling for radio-active imaging (figure 24(b)) [309]. Importantly, SWCNTs wrapped by polymeric PEG synthesized based on the PEGylation of poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene) (figure 25) showed a much longer blood circulation half-life than that of PEG-PL/SWCNT due to the pronounced PEG loading [300, 310]. While the packing density of PEG coatings immobilized on PEG-PL/SWCNT with single anchoring points is limited by steric hindrance, polymeric PEG allows continuous binding of the polymer onto the SWCNT surface, yielding a highly dense PEG coating.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been recognized as a promising material in a wide range of applications from biotechnology to energy-related devices. However, the poor solubility in aqueous and organic solvents hindered the applications of CNTs. As studies have progressed, the methodology for CNT dispersion was established. In this methodology, the key issue is to covalently or non-covalently functionalize the surfaces of the CNTs with a dispersant. Among the various types of dispersions, polymer wrapping through non-covalent interactions is attractive in terms of the stability and homogeneity of the functionalization. Recently, by taking advantage of their stability, the wrapped-polymers have been utilized to support and/or reinforce the unique functionality of the CNTs, leading to the development of high-performance devices. In this review, various polymer wrapping approaches, together with the applications of the polymer-wrapped CNTs, are summarized.

No MeSH data available.