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Non-covalent polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes and the role of wrapped polymers as functional dispersants

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ABSTRACT

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been recognized as a promising material in a wide range of applications from biotechnology to energy-related devices. However, the poor solubility in aqueous and organic solvents hindered the applications of CNTs. As studies have progressed, the methodology for CNT dispersion was established. In this methodology, the key issue is to covalently or non-covalently functionalize the surfaces of the CNTs with a dispersant. Among the various types of dispersions, polymer wrapping through non-covalent interactions is attractive in terms of the stability and homogeneity of the functionalization. Recently, by taking advantage of their stability, the wrapped-polymers have been utilized to support and/or reinforce the unique functionality of the CNTs, leading to the development of high-performance devices. In this review, various polymer wrapping approaches, together with the applications of the polymer-wrapped CNTs, are summarized.

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(a) SWCNT fluoresce (blue) in the NIR region. Blood (red) and water (black) absorbance occurs in the visible and NIR region, respectively. The gap in tissue absorbance, which occurs in the NIR region, ensures minimal tissue interference with SWCNT PL emission. (b) A schematic drawing showing various approaches for CNT-based drug delivery and cancer therapies based on PEG-PL as the platform. Part (a) reproduced with permission from A A Boghossian et al 2011 Chem. Sus. Chem.4 848. Copyright 2011 John Wiley and Sons. Part (b) reproduced based on [300].
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Figure 24: (a) SWCNT fluoresce (blue) in the NIR region. Blood (red) and water (black) absorbance occurs in the visible and NIR region, respectively. The gap in tissue absorbance, which occurs in the NIR region, ensures minimal tissue interference with SWCNT PL emission. (b) A schematic drawing showing various approaches for CNT-based drug delivery and cancer therapies based on PEG-PL as the platform. Part (a) reproduced with permission from A A Boghossian et al 2011 Chem. Sus. Chem.4 848. Copyright 2011 John Wiley and Sons. Part (b) reproduced based on [300].

Mentions: CNTs also attract much attention in the field of biotechnology [265], including biomedicine [266], biomedical imaging [267], biomedical engineering [268], tissue engineering [269], neurobiology [270], drug discovery [271], drug delivery [272], cancer therapy [273], gene therapy [274] and cell therapy [275] due to their characteristic nano-size as well as their unique optical properties showing a strong light absorption and emission in the NIR region [276]. NIR light is quite useful since most of the components in the body are transparent in the NIR region (figure 24(a)); thus, it is possible to monitor and irradiate CNTs from the outside of the body [276].


Non-covalent polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes and the role of wrapped polymers as functional dispersants
(a) SWCNT fluoresce (blue) in the NIR region. Blood (red) and water (black) absorbance occurs in the visible and NIR region, respectively. The gap in tissue absorbance, which occurs in the NIR region, ensures minimal tissue interference with SWCNT PL emission. (b) A schematic drawing showing various approaches for CNT-based drug delivery and cancer therapies based on PEG-PL as the platform. Part (a) reproduced with permission from A A Boghossian et al 2011 Chem. Sus. Chem.4 848. Copyright 2011 John Wiley and Sons. Part (b) reproduced based on [300].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036478&req=5

Figure 24: (a) SWCNT fluoresce (blue) in the NIR region. Blood (red) and water (black) absorbance occurs in the visible and NIR region, respectively. The gap in tissue absorbance, which occurs in the NIR region, ensures minimal tissue interference with SWCNT PL emission. (b) A schematic drawing showing various approaches for CNT-based drug delivery and cancer therapies based on PEG-PL as the platform. Part (a) reproduced with permission from A A Boghossian et al 2011 Chem. Sus. Chem.4 848. Copyright 2011 John Wiley and Sons. Part (b) reproduced based on [300].
Mentions: CNTs also attract much attention in the field of biotechnology [265], including biomedicine [266], biomedical imaging [267], biomedical engineering [268], tissue engineering [269], neurobiology [270], drug discovery [271], drug delivery [272], cancer therapy [273], gene therapy [274] and cell therapy [275] due to their characteristic nano-size as well as their unique optical properties showing a strong light absorption and emission in the NIR region [276]. NIR light is quite useful since most of the components in the body are transparent in the NIR region (figure 24(a)); thus, it is possible to monitor and irradiate CNTs from the outside of the body [276].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been recognized as a promising material in a wide range of applications from biotechnology to energy-related devices. However, the poor solubility in aqueous and organic solvents hindered the applications of CNTs. As studies have progressed, the methodology for CNT dispersion was established. In this methodology, the key issue is to covalently or non-covalently functionalize the surfaces of the CNTs with a dispersant. Among the various types of dispersions, polymer wrapping through non-covalent interactions is attractive in terms of the stability and homogeneity of the functionalization. Recently, by taking advantage of their stability, the wrapped-polymers have been utilized to support and/or reinforce the unique functionality of the CNTs, leading to the development of high-performance devices. In this review, various polymer wrapping approaches, together with the applications of the polymer-wrapped CNTs, are summarized.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus