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Non-covalent polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes and the role of wrapped polymers as functional dispersants

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ABSTRACT

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been recognized as a promising material in a wide range of applications from biotechnology to energy-related devices. However, the poor solubility in aqueous and organic solvents hindered the applications of CNTs. As studies have progressed, the methodology for CNT dispersion was established. In this methodology, the key issue is to covalently or non-covalently functionalize the surfaces of the CNTs with a dispersant. Among the various types of dispersions, polymer wrapping through non-covalent interactions is attractive in terms of the stability and homogeneity of the functionalization. Recently, by taking advantage of their stability, the wrapped-polymers have been utilized to support and/or reinforce the unique functionality of the CNTs, leading to the development of high-performance devices. In this review, various polymer wrapping approaches, together with the applications of the polymer-wrapped CNTs, are summarized.

No MeSH data available.


(a) A schematic drawing of the exchange reaction between SC-dissolved SWCNTs (left) and ssDNA/SWCNTs (right). (b) Absorption spectra of the SWCNT in the mixed solution of SC containing ssDNA of 0 (black), 0.0625 (red), 0.156 (orange), 0.313 (yellow), 0.469 (green), 0.938 (blue) and 15.6 μM (purple) at 25 °C. Isosbestic points were observed in the spectral changes. (c), (d) PL spectra of (c) F8BT/SWCNT and (d) P3HT/SWCNT in a chloroform solution excited at 580 nm with an increasing amount of excess (c) P3HT and (d) F8BT and measured 10 days after the addition of excess polymer. Part (b) reprinted by permission from Macmillan Publishers Ltd: Y Kato et al 2012 Sci. Rep.2 733, copyright 2012. Parts (c) and (d) reproduced with permission from S D Stranks et al 2013 Adv. Mater.25 4365. Copyright 2013 John Wiley and Sons.
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Figure 19: (a) A schematic drawing of the exchange reaction between SC-dissolved SWCNTs (left) and ssDNA/SWCNTs (right). (b) Absorption spectra of the SWCNT in the mixed solution of SC containing ssDNA of 0 (black), 0.0625 (red), 0.156 (orange), 0.313 (yellow), 0.469 (green), 0.938 (blue) and 15.6 μM (purple) at 25 °C. Isosbestic points were observed in the spectral changes. (c), (d) PL spectra of (c) F8BT/SWCNT and (d) P3HT/SWCNT in a chloroform solution excited at 580 nm with an increasing amount of excess (c) P3HT and (d) F8BT and measured 10 days after the addition of excess polymer. Part (b) reprinted by permission from Macmillan Publishers Ltd: Y Kato et al 2012 Sci. Rep.2 733, copyright 2012. Parts (c) and (d) reproduced with permission from S D Stranks et al 2013 Adv. Mater.25 4365. Copyright 2013 John Wiley and Sons.

Mentions: Absorption spectroscopy, especially in the NIR region, provides useful information, including the dispersion degree of the SWCNTs [228], the degree of wrapping [56] and the replacement of the dispersants [58, 229], since SWCNTs act as the pigment that is sensitive to the surrounding environment. We found that the addition of ssDNA to a SC-dispersed SWCNT solution led to the clear shifts in the absorption spectra in the NIR region with an isosbestic point due to the thermodynamic exchange from SC to ssDNA (figure 19). This finding allowed us to estimate the ΔT and ΔS values involved in the exchange reaction [229].


Non-covalent polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes and the role of wrapped polymers as functional dispersants
(a) A schematic drawing of the exchange reaction between SC-dissolved SWCNTs (left) and ssDNA/SWCNTs (right). (b) Absorption spectra of the SWCNT in the mixed solution of SC containing ssDNA of 0 (black), 0.0625 (red), 0.156 (orange), 0.313 (yellow), 0.469 (green), 0.938 (blue) and 15.6 μM (purple) at 25 °C. Isosbestic points were observed in the spectral changes. (c), (d) PL spectra of (c) F8BT/SWCNT and (d) P3HT/SWCNT in a chloroform solution excited at 580 nm with an increasing amount of excess (c) P3HT and (d) F8BT and measured 10 days after the addition of excess polymer. Part (b) reprinted by permission from Macmillan Publishers Ltd: Y Kato et al 2012 Sci. Rep.2 733, copyright 2012. Parts (c) and (d) reproduced with permission from S D Stranks et al 2013 Adv. Mater.25 4365. Copyright 2013 John Wiley and Sons.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 19: (a) A schematic drawing of the exchange reaction between SC-dissolved SWCNTs (left) and ssDNA/SWCNTs (right). (b) Absorption spectra of the SWCNT in the mixed solution of SC containing ssDNA of 0 (black), 0.0625 (red), 0.156 (orange), 0.313 (yellow), 0.469 (green), 0.938 (blue) and 15.6 μM (purple) at 25 °C. Isosbestic points were observed in the spectral changes. (c), (d) PL spectra of (c) F8BT/SWCNT and (d) P3HT/SWCNT in a chloroform solution excited at 580 nm with an increasing amount of excess (c) P3HT and (d) F8BT and measured 10 days after the addition of excess polymer. Part (b) reprinted by permission from Macmillan Publishers Ltd: Y Kato et al 2012 Sci. Rep.2 733, copyright 2012. Parts (c) and (d) reproduced with permission from S D Stranks et al 2013 Adv. Mater.25 4365. Copyright 2013 John Wiley and Sons.
Mentions: Absorption spectroscopy, especially in the NIR region, provides useful information, including the dispersion degree of the SWCNTs [228], the degree of wrapping [56] and the replacement of the dispersants [58, 229], since SWCNTs act as the pigment that is sensitive to the surrounding environment. We found that the addition of ssDNA to a SC-dispersed SWCNT solution led to the clear shifts in the absorption spectra in the NIR region with an isosbestic point due to the thermodynamic exchange from SC to ssDNA (figure 19). This finding allowed us to estimate the ΔT and ΔS values involved in the exchange reaction [229].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been recognized as a promising material in a wide range of applications from biotechnology to energy-related devices. However, the poor solubility in aqueous and organic solvents hindered the applications of CNTs. As studies have progressed, the methodology for CNT dispersion was established. In this methodology, the key issue is to covalently or non-covalently functionalize the surfaces of the CNTs with a dispersant. Among the various types of dispersions, polymer wrapping through non-covalent interactions is attractive in terms of the stability and homogeneity of the functionalization. Recently, by taking advantage of their stability, the wrapped-polymers have been utilized to support and/or reinforce the unique functionality of the CNTs, leading to the development of high-performance devices. In this review, various polymer wrapping approaches, together with the applications of the polymer-wrapped CNTs, are summarized.

No MeSH data available.