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Non-covalent polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes and the role of wrapped polymers as functional dispersants

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been recognized as a promising material in a wide range of applications from biotechnology to energy-related devices. However, the poor solubility in aqueous and organic solvents hindered the applications of CNTs. As studies have progressed, the methodology for CNT dispersion was established. In this methodology, the key issue is to covalently or non-covalently functionalize the surfaces of the CNTs with a dispersant. Among the various types of dispersions, polymer wrapping through non-covalent interactions is attractive in terms of the stability and homogeneity of the functionalization. Recently, by taking advantage of their stability, the wrapped-polymers have been utilized to support and/or reinforce the unique functionality of the CNTs, leading to the development of high-performance devices. In this review, various polymer wrapping approaches, together with the applications of the polymer-wrapped CNTs, are summarized.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic diagram of nanotube interactions with (a) a pyrene-containing random copolymer (left) versus a block copolymer (right) and (b) short pyrene-functionalized blocks (left) and long pyrene-functionalized blocks (right) in block copolymers. Reproduced with permission from G J Bahun et al 2006 J. Polym. Sci., A: Polym. Chem44 1941. Copyright 2006 John Wiley and Sons.
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Figure 16: Schematic diagram of nanotube interactions with (a) a pyrene-containing random copolymer (left) versus a block copolymer (right) and (b) short pyrene-functionalized blocks (left) and long pyrene-functionalized blocks (right) in block copolymers. Reproduced with permission from G J Bahun et al 2006 J. Polym. Sci., A: Polym. Chem44 1941. Copyright 2006 John Wiley and Sons.

Mentions: As for the effective design of the pendant-type dispersants, in 2006, Bahun et al reported the effect of the pendant sequence between the random versus block and found a limited solubility for the randomly labeled polymers, while a higher solubility was observed for the block copolymer with one pyrene block (figure 16(a)) [196]. The result was reasonable because for the block copolymer, the other domain can be free to extend into the solution to achieve high solvation. They also revealed that a much longer pyrene block resulted in a decrease in solubility (figure 16(b)) [196]. In 2008, it was reported that only one pyrene unit in the end of the polymer chain was long enough to disperse CNTs [199–201]. Essentially, a multipoint interaction is required for the formation of a stable polymer wrapping, and a more detailed study in terms of the wrapping stability is required in this approach.


Non-covalent polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes and the role of wrapped polymers as functional dispersants
Schematic diagram of nanotube interactions with (a) a pyrene-containing random copolymer (left) versus a block copolymer (right) and (b) short pyrene-functionalized blocks (left) and long pyrene-functionalized blocks (right) in block copolymers. Reproduced with permission from G J Bahun et al 2006 J. Polym. Sci., A: Polym. Chem44 1941. Copyright 2006 John Wiley and Sons.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036478&req=5

Figure 16: Schematic diagram of nanotube interactions with (a) a pyrene-containing random copolymer (left) versus a block copolymer (right) and (b) short pyrene-functionalized blocks (left) and long pyrene-functionalized blocks (right) in block copolymers. Reproduced with permission from G J Bahun et al 2006 J. Polym. Sci., A: Polym. Chem44 1941. Copyright 2006 John Wiley and Sons.
Mentions: As for the effective design of the pendant-type dispersants, in 2006, Bahun et al reported the effect of the pendant sequence between the random versus block and found a limited solubility for the randomly labeled polymers, while a higher solubility was observed for the block copolymer with one pyrene block (figure 16(a)) [196]. The result was reasonable because for the block copolymer, the other domain can be free to extend into the solution to achieve high solvation. They also revealed that a much longer pyrene block resulted in a decrease in solubility (figure 16(b)) [196]. In 2008, it was reported that only one pyrene unit in the end of the polymer chain was long enough to disperse CNTs [199–201]. Essentially, a multipoint interaction is required for the formation of a stable polymer wrapping, and a more detailed study in terms of the wrapping stability is required in this approach.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been recognized as a promising material in a wide range of applications from biotechnology to energy-related devices. However, the poor solubility in aqueous and organic solvents hindered the applications of CNTs. As studies have progressed, the methodology for CNT dispersion was established. In this methodology, the key issue is to covalently or non-covalently functionalize the surfaces of the CNTs with a dispersant. Among the various types of dispersions, polymer wrapping through non-covalent interactions is attractive in terms of the stability and homogeneity of the functionalization. Recently, by taking advantage of their stability, the wrapped-polymers have been utilized to support and/or reinforce the unique functionality of the CNTs, leading to the development of high-performance devices. In this review, various polymer wrapping approaches, together with the applications of the polymer-wrapped CNTs, are summarized.

No MeSH data available.