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Non-covalent polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes and the role of wrapped polymers as functional dispersants

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ABSTRACT

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been recognized as a promising material in a wide range of applications from biotechnology to energy-related devices. However, the poor solubility in aqueous and organic solvents hindered the applications of CNTs. As studies have progressed, the methodology for CNT dispersion was established. In this methodology, the key issue is to covalently or non-covalently functionalize the surfaces of the CNTs with a dispersant. Among the various types of dispersions, polymer wrapping through non-covalent interactions is attractive in terms of the stability and homogeneity of the functionalization. Recently, by taking advantage of their stability, the wrapped-polymers have been utilized to support and/or reinforce the unique functionality of the CNTs, leading to the development of high-performance devices. In this review, various polymer wrapping approaches, together with the applications of the polymer-wrapped CNTs, are summarized.

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Schematic illustration of the separation of s-SWCNTs using PFO-porphyrin and an attachment of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Reprinted with permission from H Ozawa et al 2011 J. Am. Chem. Soc.133 14771. Copyright 2011 American Chemical Society.
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Figure 10: Schematic illustration of the separation of s-SWCNTs using PFO-porphyrin and an attachment of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Reprinted with permission from H Ozawa et al 2011 J. Am. Chem. Soc.133 14771. Copyright 2011 American Chemical Society.

Mentions: In contrast to such an approach, it is not necessary to remove the wrapped polymer in the concept of ‘functional dispersant’. In order to utilize the wrapping PFO as the functional dispersant, we developed a PFO-based dispersant by introducing a carbazole-based co-monomer bearing a thiol group (PFO-carbazole, figure 7). Since the thiol group binds to the Ag surface, the PFO-wrapped s-SWCNTs were decorated with the Ag nanoparticles after the separation [103]. A similar decoration with Au nanoparticles was also achieved using the s-SWCNTs wrapped with a porphyrin-containing PFO copolymer (PFO-porphyrin, figures 7 and 10) [102]. In these examples, the wrapped PFO were functioned for the anchoring of metal nanoparticles.


Non-covalent polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes and the role of wrapped polymers as functional dispersants
Schematic illustration of the separation of s-SWCNTs using PFO-porphyrin and an attachment of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Reprinted with permission from H Ozawa et al 2011 J. Am. Chem. Soc.133 14771. Copyright 2011 American Chemical Society.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036478&req=5

Figure 10: Schematic illustration of the separation of s-SWCNTs using PFO-porphyrin and an attachment of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Reprinted with permission from H Ozawa et al 2011 J. Am. Chem. Soc.133 14771. Copyright 2011 American Chemical Society.
Mentions: In contrast to such an approach, it is not necessary to remove the wrapped polymer in the concept of ‘functional dispersant’. In order to utilize the wrapping PFO as the functional dispersant, we developed a PFO-based dispersant by introducing a carbazole-based co-monomer bearing a thiol group (PFO-carbazole, figure 7). Since the thiol group binds to the Ag surface, the PFO-wrapped s-SWCNTs were decorated with the Ag nanoparticles after the separation [103]. A similar decoration with Au nanoparticles was also achieved using the s-SWCNTs wrapped with a porphyrin-containing PFO copolymer (PFO-porphyrin, figures 7 and 10) [102]. In these examples, the wrapped PFO were functioned for the anchoring of metal nanoparticles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been recognized as a promising material in a wide range of applications from biotechnology to energy-related devices. However, the poor solubility in aqueous and organic solvents hindered the applications of CNTs. As studies have progressed, the methodology for CNT dispersion was established. In this methodology, the key issue is to covalently or non-covalently functionalize the surfaces of the CNTs with a dispersant. Among the various types of dispersions, polymer wrapping through non-covalent interactions is attractive in terms of the stability and homogeneity of the functionalization. Recently, by taking advantage of their stability, the wrapped-polymers have been utilized to support and/or reinforce the unique functionality of the CNTs, leading to the development of high-performance devices. In this review, various polymer wrapping approaches, together with the applications of the polymer-wrapped CNTs, are summarized.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus