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The anterior versus posterior hippocampal oscillations debate in human spatial navigation: evidence from an electrocorticographic case study

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ABSTRACT

Introduction: Hippocampal oscillations have been regularly described as playing a dominant role in spatial memory and navigation in rodents. In humans, the relative role of anterior versus posterior rhythms during navigational memory is not established.

Methods: Here, we tested this hypothesis using direct brain ECoG recordings in the anterior and posterior hippocampus of a patient, in a navigational task requiring spatial memory. We assessed multiple oscillatory bands during encoding and retrieval phases.

Results: We found navigation related 1–3.5 Hz activity during retrieval, both in the anterior and posterior hippocampus. Activity between 4 and 8 Hz was identified during both encoding and retrieval, only in the anterior hippocampus.

.: Our findings are consistent with the view that an anterior/posterior functional gradient is present in the hippocampus, and involves two distinct neuronal networks, supporting either encoding or retrieval processes Although this is a single case scenario, these findings suggest that neural oscillations during spatial navigation do vary across hippocampal subregions, as a function of encoding versus retrieval processes during the mnemonic process. In this single case study, the results point to the presence of a dual involvement of multiple frequency bands across hippocampal subregions during encoding and retrieval. Although these results need generalization, they provide a new perspective on distinct physiological properties of the anterior and posterior hippocampus in human spatial navigation during encoding and retrieval.

No MeSH data available.


Plot of the averaged event‐related spectral perturbation value for each frequency in the delta and theta band and the respective standard error in the anterior and posterior Hippocampus during (A) encoding and (B) retrieval. Gray regions stand for statistical different values of ERSP (P < 0.0001).
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brb3507-fig-0003: Plot of the averaged event‐related spectral perturbation value for each frequency in the delta and theta band and the respective standard error in the anterior and posterior Hippocampus during (A) encoding and (B) retrieval. Gray regions stand for statistical different values of ERSP (P < 0.0001).

Mentions: To show the consistency of these results along the whole block, we plotted the averaged event‐related spectral perturbation, ERSP, of the computed power of the 3 sec subepochs and the respective standard error (Fig. 3). Consistent results were found for each frequency, strengthening the differential pattern of anterior/posterior findings in the 5–8 Hz band. Statistically different frequencies are marked with gray color in the background in Figure 3 (resultant from a paired t‐test with P < 0.0001).


The anterior versus posterior hippocampal oscillations debate in human spatial navigation: evidence from an electrocorticographic case study
Plot of the averaged event‐related spectral perturbation value for each frequency in the delta and theta band and the respective standard error in the anterior and posterior Hippocampus during (A) encoding and (B) retrieval. Gray regions stand for statistical different values of ERSP (P < 0.0001).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036430&req=5

brb3507-fig-0003: Plot of the averaged event‐related spectral perturbation value for each frequency in the delta and theta band and the respective standard error in the anterior and posterior Hippocampus during (A) encoding and (B) retrieval. Gray regions stand for statistical different values of ERSP (P < 0.0001).
Mentions: To show the consistency of these results along the whole block, we plotted the averaged event‐related spectral perturbation, ERSP, of the computed power of the 3 sec subepochs and the respective standard error (Fig. 3). Consistent results were found for each frequency, strengthening the differential pattern of anterior/posterior findings in the 5–8 Hz band. Statistically different frequencies are marked with gray color in the background in Figure 3 (resultant from a paired t‐test with P < 0.0001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Hippocampal oscillations have been regularly described as playing a dominant role in spatial memory and navigation in rodents. In humans, the relative role of anterior versus posterior rhythms during navigational memory is not established.

Methods: Here, we tested this hypothesis using direct brain ECoG recordings in the anterior and posterior hippocampus of a patient, in a navigational task requiring spatial memory. We assessed multiple oscillatory bands during encoding and retrieval phases.

Results: We found navigation related 1&ndash;3.5&nbsp;Hz activity during retrieval, both in the anterior and posterior hippocampus. Activity between 4 and 8&nbsp;Hz was identified during both encoding and retrieval, only in the anterior hippocampus.

.: Our findings are consistent with the view that an anterior/posterior functional gradient is present in the hippocampus, and involves two distinct neuronal networks, supporting either encoding or retrieval processes Although this is a single case scenario, these findings suggest that neural oscillations during spatial navigation do vary across hippocampal subregions, as a function of encoding versus retrieval processes during the mnemonic process. In this single case study, the results point to the presence of a dual involvement of multiple frequency bands across hippocampal subregions during encoding and retrieval. Although these results need generalization, they provide a new perspective on distinct physiological properties of the anterior and posterior hippocampus in human spatial navigation during encoding and retrieval.

No MeSH data available.