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A review of novel analytical diagnostics for liquid biopsies: spectroscopic and spectrometric serum profiling of primary and secondary brain tumors

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Spectroscopic and spectrometric analysis of biological samples is regarded as quick, cost effective, easy to operate, and spectroscopic sample preparation involves minimal sample preparation.

Results: Techniques like infrared (IR) spectroscopy, surface‐enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI)‐mass spectroscopy (MS), and matrix‐assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ‐MS could enable early diagnosis of cancer, disease monitoring, and assessment of treatment responses allowing refinement, if required.

Discussion: Carrying out analytical testing within outpatient clinics would dramatically cut the time spent by patients attending different appointments, at different locations, save hospital time and resources but importantly would theoretically enable a reduction in mortality and morbidity. While the advantages of such a prospect seem obvious, this review aims to evaluate the use of human serum spectroscopic and spectrometric analysis as a diagnostic tool for brain cancers, creating a platform for the future of cancer diagnostics.

No MeSH data available.


The process from the blood sample being obtained up until the acquired spectrum. Starting with the blood sample taken from the patient, which is then centrifuged to separate out the serum from all other components. The serum is then analyzed using ATR‐FTIR spectroscopy, which produces a spectrum allowing the protein, lipid, nucleic acid, and carbohydrate peaks to be seen. Data analysis follows which differentiates cancerous samples from healthy samples. Figure adapted from (Baker et al. 2014).
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brb3502-fig-0002: The process from the blood sample being obtained up until the acquired spectrum. Starting with the blood sample taken from the patient, which is then centrifuged to separate out the serum from all other components. The serum is then analyzed using ATR‐FTIR spectroscopy, which produces a spectrum allowing the protein, lipid, nucleic acid, and carbohydrate peaks to be seen. Data analysis follows which differentiates cancerous samples from healthy samples. Figure adapted from (Baker et al. 2014).

Mentions: Infrared analysis is already used worldwide, creating a mature market for easy translation into routine clinics. Studies have reviewed the characteristics and advantages of the technique (Hughes et al. 2016); the proposed process is highlighted in Figure 2 (Baker et al. 2014).


A review of novel analytical diagnostics for liquid biopsies: spectroscopic and spectrometric serum profiling of primary and secondary brain tumors
The process from the blood sample being obtained up until the acquired spectrum. Starting with the blood sample taken from the patient, which is then centrifuged to separate out the serum from all other components. The serum is then analyzed using ATR‐FTIR spectroscopy, which produces a spectrum allowing the protein, lipid, nucleic acid, and carbohydrate peaks to be seen. Data analysis follows which differentiates cancerous samples from healthy samples. Figure adapted from (Baker et al. 2014).
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036428&req=5

brb3502-fig-0002: The process from the blood sample being obtained up until the acquired spectrum. Starting with the blood sample taken from the patient, which is then centrifuged to separate out the serum from all other components. The serum is then analyzed using ATR‐FTIR spectroscopy, which produces a spectrum allowing the protein, lipid, nucleic acid, and carbohydrate peaks to be seen. Data analysis follows which differentiates cancerous samples from healthy samples. Figure adapted from (Baker et al. 2014).
Mentions: Infrared analysis is already used worldwide, creating a mature market for easy translation into routine clinics. Studies have reviewed the characteristics and advantages of the technique (Hughes et al. 2016); the proposed process is highlighted in Figure 2 (Baker et al. 2014).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Spectroscopic and spectrometric analysis of biological samples is regarded as quick, cost effective, easy to operate, and spectroscopic sample preparation involves minimal sample preparation.

Results: Techniques like infrared (IR) spectroscopy, surface‐enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI)‐mass spectroscopy (MS), and matrix‐assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ‐MS could enable early diagnosis of cancer, disease monitoring, and assessment of treatment responses allowing refinement, if required.

Discussion: Carrying out analytical testing within outpatient clinics would dramatically cut the time spent by patients attending different appointments, at different locations, save hospital time and resources but importantly would theoretically enable a reduction in mortality and morbidity. While the advantages of such a prospect seem obvious, this review aims to evaluate the use of human serum spectroscopic and spectrometric analysis as a diagnostic tool for brain cancers, creating a platform for the future of cancer diagnostics.

No MeSH data available.