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Filamentation protects Candida albicans fromamphotericin B-induced programmed cell death via a mechanism involving the yeast metacaspase, MCA1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The budding yeast Candida albicans is one of the mostsignificant fungal pathogens worldwide. It proliferates in two distinct celltypes: blastopores and filaments. Only cells that are able to transform from onecell type into the other are virulent in mouse disease models. Programmed celldeath is a controlled form of cell suicide that occurs when C.albicans cells are exposed to fungicidal drugs like amphotericin Band caspofungin, and to other stressful conditions. We now provide evidence thatsuggests that programmed cell death is cell-type specific in yeast: FilamentousC. albicans cells are more resistant to amphotericin B- andcaspofungin-induced programmed cell death than their blastospore counterparts.Finally, our genetic data suggests that this phenomenon is mediated by aprotective mechanism involving the yeast metacaspase, MCA1.

No MeSH data available.


FIGURE 2: Filamentous C. albicans cells are moreresistant than blastospores to AMB-induced programmed cell death in anMCA1-dependent manner. Viability curves compare survival of the following cells exposed to AMB:(A) wild type (BWP17) blastospores and BWP17 filamentsinduced using 10% FBS; (B) BWP17-derivedΔΔmca1/mca1 blastospores andΔΔmca1/mca1 filaments induced using 10% FBS; and(C)ΔΔmca1/mca1::MCA1 blastospores andΔΔmca1/mca1::MCA1 filaments induced using 10% FBS.Error bars indicate standard deviations for trials with at least threeindependent cultures. Note that after 3 hr, cells cultured in rich mediawithout any drugs were able to grow and to divide, hence the relativeviability levels that are greater than 100%. A single, double, and tripleasterisk indicates statistical significance of p < 0.05, p < 0.005,and p < 0.0005, respectively, as compared to treated controls.Statistical significance was determined with the unpaired Student’st-test.
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Fig2: FIGURE 2: Filamentous C. albicans cells are moreresistant than blastospores to AMB-induced programmed cell death in anMCA1-dependent manner. Viability curves compare survival of the following cells exposed to AMB:(A) wild type (BWP17) blastospores and BWP17 filamentsinduced using 10% FBS; (B) BWP17-derivedΔΔmca1/mca1 blastospores andΔΔmca1/mca1 filaments induced using 10% FBS; and(C)ΔΔmca1/mca1::MCA1 blastospores andΔΔmca1/mca1::MCA1 filaments induced using 10% FBS.Error bars indicate standard deviations for trials with at least threeindependent cultures. Note that after 3 hr, cells cultured in rich mediawithout any drugs were able to grow and to divide, hence the relativeviability levels that are greater than 100%. A single, double, and tripleasterisk indicates statistical significance of p < 0.05, p < 0.005,and p < 0.0005, respectively, as compared to treated controls.Statistical significance was determined with the unpaired Student’st-test.


Filamentation protects Candida albicans fromamphotericin B-induced programmed cell death via a mechanism involving the yeast metacaspase, MCA1
FIGURE 2: Filamentous C. albicans cells are moreresistant than blastospores to AMB-induced programmed cell death in anMCA1-dependent manner. Viability curves compare survival of the following cells exposed to AMB:(A) wild type (BWP17) blastospores and BWP17 filamentsinduced using 10% FBS; (B) BWP17-derivedΔΔmca1/mca1 blastospores andΔΔmca1/mca1 filaments induced using 10% FBS; and(C)ΔΔmca1/mca1::MCA1 blastospores andΔΔmca1/mca1::MCA1 filaments induced using 10% FBS.Error bars indicate standard deviations for trials with at least threeindependent cultures. Note that after 3 hr, cells cultured in rich mediawithout any drugs were able to grow and to divide, hence the relativeviability levels that are greater than 100%. A single, double, and tripleasterisk indicates statistical significance of p < 0.05, p < 0.005,and p < 0.0005, respectively, as compared to treated controls.Statistical significance was determined with the unpaired Student’st-test.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036395&req=5

Fig2: FIGURE 2: Filamentous C. albicans cells are moreresistant than blastospores to AMB-induced programmed cell death in anMCA1-dependent manner. Viability curves compare survival of the following cells exposed to AMB:(A) wild type (BWP17) blastospores and BWP17 filamentsinduced using 10% FBS; (B) BWP17-derivedΔΔmca1/mca1 blastospores andΔΔmca1/mca1 filaments induced using 10% FBS; and(C)ΔΔmca1/mca1::MCA1 blastospores andΔΔmca1/mca1::MCA1 filaments induced using 10% FBS.Error bars indicate standard deviations for trials with at least threeindependent cultures. Note that after 3 hr, cells cultured in rich mediawithout any drugs were able to grow and to divide, hence the relativeviability levels that are greater than 100%. A single, double, and tripleasterisk indicates statistical significance of p < 0.05, p < 0.005,and p < 0.0005, respectively, as compared to treated controls.Statistical significance was determined with the unpaired Student’st-test.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The budding yeast Candida albicans is one of the mostsignificant fungal pathogens worldwide. It proliferates in two distinct celltypes: blastopores and filaments. Only cells that are able to transform from onecell type into the other are virulent in mouse disease models. Programmed celldeath is a controlled form of cell suicide that occurs when C.albicans cells are exposed to fungicidal drugs like amphotericin Band caspofungin, and to other stressful conditions. We now provide evidence thatsuggests that programmed cell death is cell-type specific in yeast: FilamentousC. albicans cells are more resistant to amphotericin B- andcaspofungin-induced programmed cell death than their blastospore counterparts.Finally, our genetic data suggests that this phenomenon is mediated by aprotective mechanism involving the yeast metacaspase, MCA1.

No MeSH data available.