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Serum ACE Level in Sarcoidosis Patients with Typical and Atypical HRCT Manifestation

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ABSTRACT

Background: Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease that affects multiple organs. Before widespread use of computed tomography (CT), the severity of sarcoidosis was assessed based on chest X-ray abnormalities. HRCT can distinguish between active inflammatory changes and irreversible fibrosis. In this study, we analyzed different ACE levels in 148 patients diagnosed with sarcoidosis.

Material/methods: We categorized these patients based on their HRCT results into four groups: 1) patients diagnosed with chronic disease; 2) patients diagnosed with non-chronic disease; 3) patients who exhibited typical HRCT changes; and 4) patients who exhibited atypical HRCT changes. Afterward the mean ACE level of each group was calculated and compared.

Result: The HRCT scans of chronic sarcoidosis patients tended to show more atypical sarcoidosis patterns. Moreover, there was a reverse correlation between chronicity and ACE level (P-value <0.05).

Conclusions: HRCT is another modality which would be useful when the diagnosis of sarcoidosis is not definite.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Typical sarcoidosis.
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f3-poljradiol-81-458: Typical sarcoidosis.

Mentions: Before widespread use of computed tomography (CT), the severity of sarcoidosis, based on chest X-ray abnormalities, was categorized according to the Kveim-Siltzbach method [6]. CT scanning, particularly high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), is very effective at detecting minor pulmonary parenchymal abnormalities at the first stages of sarcoidosis [4,7]. Moreover, HRCT can distinguish between active inflammatory changes and irreversible fibrosis. For example, findings such as parenchymal nodules, ground-glass opacity, and alveolar opacity are indicative of granulomatous inflammation, which is usually reversible after therapy [8]. In contrast, abnormalities such as honeycomb changes, bullae formation, and thick septal bronchiectasis bands are indicative of irreversible fibrosis [9,10] (Figures 1–3).


Serum ACE Level in Sarcoidosis Patients with Typical and Atypical HRCT Manifestation
Typical sarcoidosis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036380&req=5

f3-poljradiol-81-458: Typical sarcoidosis.
Mentions: Before widespread use of computed tomography (CT), the severity of sarcoidosis, based on chest X-ray abnormalities, was categorized according to the Kveim-Siltzbach method [6]. CT scanning, particularly high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), is very effective at detecting minor pulmonary parenchymal abnormalities at the first stages of sarcoidosis [4,7]. Moreover, HRCT can distinguish between active inflammatory changes and irreversible fibrosis. For example, findings such as parenchymal nodules, ground-glass opacity, and alveolar opacity are indicative of granulomatous inflammation, which is usually reversible after therapy [8]. In contrast, abnormalities such as honeycomb changes, bullae formation, and thick septal bronchiectasis bands are indicative of irreversible fibrosis [9,10] (Figures 1–3).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease that affects multiple organs. Before widespread use of computed tomography (CT), the severity of sarcoidosis was assessed based on chest X-ray abnormalities. HRCT can distinguish between active inflammatory changes and irreversible fibrosis. In this study, we analyzed different ACE levels in 148 patients diagnosed with sarcoidosis.

Material/methods: We categorized these patients based on their HRCT results into four groups: 1) patients diagnosed with chronic disease; 2) patients diagnosed with non-chronic disease; 3) patients who exhibited typical HRCT changes; and 4) patients who exhibited atypical HRCT changes. Afterward the mean ACE level of each group was calculated and compared.

Result: The HRCT scans of chronic sarcoidosis patients tended to show more atypical sarcoidosis patterns. Moreover, there was a reverse correlation between chronicity and ACE level (P-value <0.05).

Conclusions: HRCT is another modality which would be useful when the diagnosis of sarcoidosis is not definite.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus