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Thumb ultrasound: Technique and pathologies

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Ultrasound is ideally suited for the assessment of complex anatomy and pathologies of the thumb. Focused and dynamic thumb ultrasound can provide a rapid real-time diagnosis and can be used for guided treatment in certain clinical situations. We present a simplified approach to scanning technique for thumb-related pathologies and illustrate a spectrum of common and uncommon pathologies encountered.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flexor pollicis longus tendon tear (A-C). Schematic diagram (A) shows tear of the flexor pollicis longus tendon with torn retracted edges. Long axis (B and C) ultrasound views in 2 different patients shows tear of the flexor pollicis longus tendon with retracted ends marked with calipers at different levels. (Proximal phalynx - P)
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Figure 7: Flexor pollicis longus tendon tear (A-C). Schematic diagram (A) shows tear of the flexor pollicis longus tendon with torn retracted edges. Long axis (B and C) ultrasound views in 2 different patients shows tear of the flexor pollicis longus tendon with retracted ends marked with calipers at different levels. (Proximal phalynx - P)

Mentions: Acute tendon injuries tend to take the form of direct impact injury, stretch injury during contraction (strain), or penetrating injury. Depending on the site of tear of the tendon, injuries are classified into zones [Table 1]. The treatment and functional outcome depend on the zone of injury.[45] Ultrasound is useful to confirm the presence of tendon rupture [Figures 6 and 7], differentiate between the partial thickness and full thickness tears [Video 3], identify if the tear is associated with bony avulsion [Figure 8A–C], as well as to identify the precise location of the tendon ends.


Thumb ultrasound: Technique and pathologies
Flexor pollicis longus tendon tear (A-C). Schematic diagram (A) shows tear of the flexor pollicis longus tendon with torn retracted edges. Long axis (B and C) ultrasound views in 2 different patients shows tear of the flexor pollicis longus tendon with retracted ends marked with calipers at different levels. (Proximal phalynx - P)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036340&req=5

Figure 7: Flexor pollicis longus tendon tear (A-C). Schematic diagram (A) shows tear of the flexor pollicis longus tendon with torn retracted edges. Long axis (B and C) ultrasound views in 2 different patients shows tear of the flexor pollicis longus tendon with retracted ends marked with calipers at different levels. (Proximal phalynx - P)
Mentions: Acute tendon injuries tend to take the form of direct impact injury, stretch injury during contraction (strain), or penetrating injury. Depending on the site of tear of the tendon, injuries are classified into zones [Table 1]. The treatment and functional outcome depend on the zone of injury.[45] Ultrasound is useful to confirm the presence of tendon rupture [Figures 6 and 7], differentiate between the partial thickness and full thickness tears [Video 3], identify if the tear is associated with bony avulsion [Figure 8A–C], as well as to identify the precise location of the tendon ends.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Ultrasound is ideally suited for the assessment of complex anatomy and pathologies of the thumb. Focused and dynamic thumb ultrasound can provide a rapid real-time diagnosis and can be used for guided treatment in certain clinical situations. We present a simplified approach to scanning technique for thumb-related pathologies and illustrate a spectrum of common and uncommon pathologies encountered.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus