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Thumb ultrasound: Technique and pathologies

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Ultrasound is ideally suited for the assessment of complex anatomy and pathologies of the thumb. Focused and dynamic thumb ultrasound can provide a rapid real-time diagnosis and can be used for guided treatment in certain clinical situations. We present a simplified approach to scanning technique for thumb-related pathologies and illustrate a spectrum of common and uncommon pathologies encountered.

No MeSH data available.


Probe positions and ultrasound images for evaluation of joints (A-K). Karate chop position of the hand with probe (A) and corresponding ultrasound image of the carpometacarpal joint (B). Ultrasound image of STT joint (C). Probe position for metacarpophalengeal joint, dorsal (D) and volar (E) with corresponding ultrasound image (F and G). Probe position for interphalengeal joint, dorsal (H), and volar (I) with corresponding ultrasound image (J and K). (Radius - R, scaphoid - S, 1st metacarpal - M, trapezium - T, proximal phalynx - P, distal phalynx - D, FPL - F, volar/palmar plate – V, and EPL - E.)
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Figure 1: Probe positions and ultrasound images for evaluation of joints (A-K). Karate chop position of the hand with probe (A) and corresponding ultrasound image of the carpometacarpal joint (B). Ultrasound image of STT joint (C). Probe position for metacarpophalengeal joint, dorsal (D) and volar (E) with corresponding ultrasound image (F and G). Probe position for interphalengeal joint, dorsal (H), and volar (I) with corresponding ultrasound image (J and K). (Radius - R, scaphoid - S, 1st metacarpal - M, trapezium - T, proximal phalynx - P, distal phalynx - D, FPL - F, volar/palmar plate – V, and EPL - E.)

Mentions: Important joints to be evaluated are interphalangeal, first carpometacarpal (CMC)/trapeziometacarpal joint and scaphotrapeziotrapezoid (STT) joint. The first CMC joint is best examined with the patient seated opposite and placing the ulnar aspect of their hand against the examination couch—karate chop position [Figure 1A] with the probe placed in the sagittal plane. The first metacarpal is distinguished from the much shorter trapezium and, from this landmark, the CMC joint is easily found [Figure 1B]. Scaphotrapeziotrapezoid joint can be evaluated by moving the probe proximally in the sagittal plane [Figure 1C]. Then we have the metacarpophalengeal and interphalengeal joint, which can be evaluated while assessing the extensor and flexor tendons [Figure 1D–K].


Thumb ultrasound: Technique and pathologies
Probe positions and ultrasound images for evaluation of joints (A-K). Karate chop position of the hand with probe (A) and corresponding ultrasound image of the carpometacarpal joint (B). Ultrasound image of STT joint (C). Probe position for metacarpophalengeal joint, dorsal (D) and volar (E) with corresponding ultrasound image (F and G). Probe position for interphalengeal joint, dorsal (H), and volar (I) with corresponding ultrasound image (J and K). (Radius - R, scaphoid - S, 1st metacarpal - M, trapezium - T, proximal phalynx - P, distal phalynx - D, FPL - F, volar/palmar plate – V, and EPL - E.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036340&req=5

Figure 1: Probe positions and ultrasound images for evaluation of joints (A-K). Karate chop position of the hand with probe (A) and corresponding ultrasound image of the carpometacarpal joint (B). Ultrasound image of STT joint (C). Probe position for metacarpophalengeal joint, dorsal (D) and volar (E) with corresponding ultrasound image (F and G). Probe position for interphalengeal joint, dorsal (H), and volar (I) with corresponding ultrasound image (J and K). (Radius - R, scaphoid - S, 1st metacarpal - M, trapezium - T, proximal phalynx - P, distal phalynx - D, FPL - F, volar/palmar plate – V, and EPL - E.)
Mentions: Important joints to be evaluated are interphalangeal, first carpometacarpal (CMC)/trapeziometacarpal joint and scaphotrapeziotrapezoid (STT) joint. The first CMC joint is best examined with the patient seated opposite and placing the ulnar aspect of their hand against the examination couch—karate chop position [Figure 1A] with the probe placed in the sagittal plane. The first metacarpal is distinguished from the much shorter trapezium and, from this landmark, the CMC joint is easily found [Figure 1B]. Scaphotrapeziotrapezoid joint can be evaluated by moving the probe proximally in the sagittal plane [Figure 1C]. Then we have the metacarpophalengeal and interphalengeal joint, which can be evaluated while assessing the extensor and flexor tendons [Figure 1D–K].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Ultrasound is ideally suited for the assessment of complex anatomy and pathologies of the thumb. Focused and dynamic thumb ultrasound can provide a rapid real-time diagnosis and can be used for guided treatment in certain clinical situations. We present a simplified approach to scanning technique for thumb-related pathologies and illustrate a spectrum of common and uncommon pathologies encountered.

No MeSH data available.