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Patent ductus venosus presenting with cholestatic jaundice in an infant with successful trans-catheter closure using a vascular plug device

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Persistent ductus venosus as a cause of cholestatic jaundice is very rare. Treatment varies, but is usually reserved for infants in whom complications develop. We report a 5-week-old female infant with cholestatic jaundice caused by a patent ductus venosus and subsequent successful treatment via a transcatheter occlusion using a vascular plug device.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A and B) Deployment of the vascular plug into the patent ductus venosus. Frontal views after insertion and deployment of the vascular plug (solid white arrows) into the ductus venosus, but prior to detachment. Angiography confirms patency and drainage of the right hepatic vein (dashed arrows)
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Figure 5: (A and B) Deployment of the vascular plug into the patent ductus venosus. Frontal views after insertion and deployment of the vascular plug (solid white arrows) into the ductus venosus, but prior to detachment. Angiography confirms patency and drainage of the right hepatic vein (dashed arrows)

Mentions: A sleeve with a female thread on the proximal end of the device allows attachment of a delivery cable with a male screw, which then allows the device to be placed into the loader and delivery sheath. The device was successfully deployed using the proprietary Amplatzer delivery systems. Prior to detachment, angiographic runs demonstrated occlusion of the ductus venosus and patency of adjacent hepatic veins [Figures 5 and 6]. The device was successfully detached [Figure 6] and no complications were noted.


Patent ductus venosus presenting with cholestatic jaundice in an infant with successful trans-catheter closure using a vascular plug device
(A and B) Deployment of the vascular plug into the patent ductus venosus. Frontal views after insertion and deployment of the vascular plug (solid white arrows) into the ductus venosus, but prior to detachment. Angiography confirms patency and drainage of the right hepatic vein (dashed arrows)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036338&req=5

Figure 5: (A and B) Deployment of the vascular plug into the patent ductus venosus. Frontal views after insertion and deployment of the vascular plug (solid white arrows) into the ductus venosus, but prior to detachment. Angiography confirms patency and drainage of the right hepatic vein (dashed arrows)
Mentions: A sleeve with a female thread on the proximal end of the device allows attachment of a delivery cable with a male screw, which then allows the device to be placed into the loader and delivery sheath. The device was successfully deployed using the proprietary Amplatzer delivery systems. Prior to detachment, angiographic runs demonstrated occlusion of the ductus venosus and patency of adjacent hepatic veins [Figures 5 and 6]. The device was successfully detached [Figure 6] and no complications were noted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Persistent ductus venosus as a cause of cholestatic jaundice is very rare. Treatment varies, but is usually reserved for infants in whom complications develop. We report a 5-week-old female infant with cholestatic jaundice caused by a patent ductus venosus and subsequent successful treatment via a transcatheter occlusion using a vascular plug device.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus