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Patent ductus venosus presenting with cholestatic jaundice in an infant with successful trans-catheter closure using a vascular plug device

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Persistent ductus venosus as a cause of cholestatic jaundice is very rare. Treatment varies, but is usually reserved for infants in whom complications develop. We report a 5-week-old female infant with cholestatic jaundice caused by a patent ductus venosus and subsequent successful treatment via a transcatheter occlusion using a vascular plug device.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Sagittal ultrasound in a 5-week-old neonate with patent ductus venosus: (A) A cystic lesion is demonstrated within the right lobe of the liver (callipers) (B) The ligamentum teres (dashed white arrow) was identified in close relation to the cystic lesion (solid white arrow) (C) Color flow Doppler confirms the vascularity of the lesion (D) Zoomed image demonstrates the close relation and extension (solid black arrow) into the ligamentum teres confirming the diagnosis of a patent ductus venosus
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Figure 2: Sagittal ultrasound in a 5-week-old neonate with patent ductus venosus: (A) A cystic lesion is demonstrated within the right lobe of the liver (callipers) (B) The ligamentum teres (dashed white arrow) was identified in close relation to the cystic lesion (solid white arrow) (C) Color flow Doppler confirms the vascularity of the lesion (D) Zoomed image demonstrates the close relation and extension (solid black arrow) into the ligamentum teres confirming the diagnosis of a patent ductus venosus

Mentions: An abdominal ultrasound showed a vascular channel directly adjacent to the ligamentum teres [Figure 2]. The vascular channel was identified as a patent ductus venosus.


Patent ductus venosus presenting with cholestatic jaundice in an infant with successful trans-catheter closure using a vascular plug device
Sagittal ultrasound in a 5-week-old neonate with patent ductus venosus: (A) A cystic lesion is demonstrated within the right lobe of the liver (callipers) (B) The ligamentum teres (dashed white arrow) was identified in close relation to the cystic lesion (solid white arrow) (C) Color flow Doppler confirms the vascularity of the lesion (D) Zoomed image demonstrates the close relation and extension (solid black arrow) into the ligamentum teres confirming the diagnosis of a patent ductus venosus
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036338&req=5

Figure 2: Sagittal ultrasound in a 5-week-old neonate with patent ductus venosus: (A) A cystic lesion is demonstrated within the right lobe of the liver (callipers) (B) The ligamentum teres (dashed white arrow) was identified in close relation to the cystic lesion (solid white arrow) (C) Color flow Doppler confirms the vascularity of the lesion (D) Zoomed image demonstrates the close relation and extension (solid black arrow) into the ligamentum teres confirming the diagnosis of a patent ductus venosus
Mentions: An abdominal ultrasound showed a vascular channel directly adjacent to the ligamentum teres [Figure 2]. The vascular channel was identified as a patent ductus venosus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Persistent ductus venosus as a cause of cholestatic jaundice is very rare. Treatment varies, but is usually reserved for infants in whom complications develop. We report a 5-week-old female infant with cholestatic jaundice caused by a patent ductus venosus and subsequent successful treatment via a transcatheter occlusion using a vascular plug device.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus