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Patent ductus venosus presenting with cholestatic jaundice in an infant with successful trans-catheter closure using a vascular plug device

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ABSTRACT

Persistent ductus venosus as a cause of cholestatic jaundice is very rare. Treatment varies, but is usually reserved for infants in whom complications develop. We report a 5-week-old female infant with cholestatic jaundice caused by a patent ductus venosus and subsequent successful treatment via a transcatheter occlusion using a vascular plug device.

No MeSH data available.


Sketch diagram of the normal anatomy of the hepatic circulation at birth. The dashed arrows indicate the flow of oxygenated blood from the placenta, while the solid small black arrows indicate deoxygenated blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract in the portal vein and from the tributaries of the inferior vena cava. The large solid black arrow indicates combination of flow in the inferior vena cava flowing to the heart. (DV = Ductus venosus, IVC = Inferior vena cava, LHV = Left hepatic vein, PV = Portal vein, RHC = Right hepatic vein, UV = Umbilical vein)
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Figure 1: Sketch diagram of the normal anatomy of the hepatic circulation at birth. The dashed arrows indicate the flow of oxygenated blood from the placenta, while the solid small black arrows indicate deoxygenated blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract in the portal vein and from the tributaries of the inferior vena cava. The large solid black arrow indicates combination of flow in the inferior vena cava flowing to the heart. (DV = Ductus venosus, IVC = Inferior vena cava, LHV = Left hepatic vein, PV = Portal vein, RHC = Right hepatic vein, UV = Umbilical vein)

Mentions: Ductus venosus is a connection between the left umbilical vein and the right hepatocardiac channel (which later becomes inferior vena cava) in fetal circulation [Figure 1]. The ductus closes immediately (within hours) after birth in the vast majority of term infants and within 2 days in the majority of premature infants.[1] Persistent patent ductus venosus is very rare worldwide, with varying treatment options including surgical ligation and banding, liver transplantation, and transcatheter detachable coil closure being described. To our knowledge, of the 27 reported cases worldwide, 9 cases[23456789] have utilized transcatheter treatment and coil or vascular plug embolization, and of these, only 6 were performed in children.[23678] The most recent report is of closure in a 14-year-old.[9] We report on a female infant with a patent ductus venosus, which was successfully treated by transvenous occlusion with a vascular plug at the age of 5 weeks.


Patent ductus venosus presenting with cholestatic jaundice in an infant with successful trans-catheter closure using a vascular plug device
Sketch diagram of the normal anatomy of the hepatic circulation at birth. The dashed arrows indicate the flow of oxygenated blood from the placenta, while the solid small black arrows indicate deoxygenated blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract in the portal vein and from the tributaries of the inferior vena cava. The large solid black arrow indicates combination of flow in the inferior vena cava flowing to the heart. (DV = Ductus venosus, IVC = Inferior vena cava, LHV = Left hepatic vein, PV = Portal vein, RHC = Right hepatic vein, UV = Umbilical vein)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036338&req=5

Figure 1: Sketch diagram of the normal anatomy of the hepatic circulation at birth. The dashed arrows indicate the flow of oxygenated blood from the placenta, while the solid small black arrows indicate deoxygenated blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract in the portal vein and from the tributaries of the inferior vena cava. The large solid black arrow indicates combination of flow in the inferior vena cava flowing to the heart. (DV = Ductus venosus, IVC = Inferior vena cava, LHV = Left hepatic vein, PV = Portal vein, RHC = Right hepatic vein, UV = Umbilical vein)
Mentions: Ductus venosus is a connection between the left umbilical vein and the right hepatocardiac channel (which later becomes inferior vena cava) in fetal circulation [Figure 1]. The ductus closes immediately (within hours) after birth in the vast majority of term infants and within 2 days in the majority of premature infants.[1] Persistent patent ductus venosus is very rare worldwide, with varying treatment options including surgical ligation and banding, liver transplantation, and transcatheter detachable coil closure being described. To our knowledge, of the 27 reported cases worldwide, 9 cases[23456789] have utilized transcatheter treatment and coil or vascular plug embolization, and of these, only 6 were performed in children.[23678] The most recent report is of closure in a 14-year-old.[9] We report on a female infant with a patent ductus venosus, which was successfully treated by transvenous occlusion with a vascular plug at the age of 5 weeks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Persistent ductus venosus as a cause of cholestatic jaundice is very rare. Treatment varies, but is usually reserved for infants in whom complications develop. We report a 5-week-old female infant with cholestatic jaundice caused by a patent ductus venosus and subsequent successful treatment via a transcatheter occlusion using a vascular plug device.

No MeSH data available.