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Sclerosing liposarcoma of epididymis: Role of chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Sclerosing liposarcoma of epididymis is a rare extratesticular scrotal tumor with variable prognosis. Ultrasonography is the initial imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of scrotal mass and helps to differentiate testicular and extratesticular masses, thereby narrowing down the differential diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging with its excellent soft tissue resolution can help in the further characterization of the nature of the tumor. In this case report, we highlight the role of chemical shift imaging in making a confident preoperative diagnosis of liposarcoma thereby guiding optimal and timely management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Grey scale ultrasound shows hyperechoic mass (arrow) separate from the testis (asterisk). (B) Color Doppler ultrasound shows minimal internal vascularity. (C) Axial and (D) coronal contrast-enhanced CT shows heterogeneously enhancing extratesticular mass (arrow) separate from the testes (asterisk). P: Penis
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Figure 1: (A) Grey scale ultrasound shows hyperechoic mass (arrow) separate from the testis (asterisk). (B) Color Doppler ultrasound shows minimal internal vascularity. (C) Axial and (D) coronal contrast-enhanced CT shows heterogeneously enhancing extratesticular mass (arrow) separate from the testes (asterisk). P: Penis

Mentions: USG was performed using 3–12 MHz high-frequency linear transducer (LOGIQ E9, General Electric Medical Systems, Chicago, USA) and it revealed a heterogenous, well-defined, extra-testicular mass posterior and inferior to the left testis. It was predominantly hyperechoic, measuring 5 × 4.5 × 2.6 cm, and showed minimal vascularity. Considering the solid nature of the mass, possibility of neoplastic etiology was entertained and a staging computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest and abdomen was performed using intravenous contrast. It showed a heterogeneously enhancing left hemiscrotal mass separate from the testis with no retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy or lung metastasis [Figure 1].


Sclerosing liposarcoma of epididymis: Role of chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging
(A) Grey scale ultrasound shows hyperechoic mass (arrow) separate from the testis (asterisk). (B) Color Doppler ultrasound shows minimal internal vascularity. (C) Axial and (D) coronal contrast-enhanced CT shows heterogeneously enhancing extratesticular mass (arrow) separate from the testes (asterisk). P: Penis
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036334&req=5

Figure 1: (A) Grey scale ultrasound shows hyperechoic mass (arrow) separate from the testis (asterisk). (B) Color Doppler ultrasound shows minimal internal vascularity. (C) Axial and (D) coronal contrast-enhanced CT shows heterogeneously enhancing extratesticular mass (arrow) separate from the testes (asterisk). P: Penis
Mentions: USG was performed using 3–12 MHz high-frequency linear transducer (LOGIQ E9, General Electric Medical Systems, Chicago, USA) and it revealed a heterogenous, well-defined, extra-testicular mass posterior and inferior to the left testis. It was predominantly hyperechoic, measuring 5 × 4.5 × 2.6 cm, and showed minimal vascularity. Considering the solid nature of the mass, possibility of neoplastic etiology was entertained and a staging computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest and abdomen was performed using intravenous contrast. It showed a heterogeneously enhancing left hemiscrotal mass separate from the testis with no retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy or lung metastasis [Figure 1].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Sclerosing liposarcoma of epididymis is a rare extratesticular scrotal tumor with variable prognosis. Ultrasonography is the initial imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of scrotal mass and helps to differentiate testicular and extratesticular masses, thereby narrowing down the differential diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging with its excellent soft tissue resolution can help in the further characterization of the nature of the tumor. In this case report, we highlight the role of chemical shift imaging in making a confident preoperative diagnosis of liposarcoma thereby guiding optimal and timely management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus