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Actionability and Simulation: No Representation without Communication

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

There remains considerable controversy about how the brain operates. This review focuses on brain activity rather than just structure and on concepts of action and actionability rather than truth conditions. Neural Communication is reviewed as a crucial aspect of neural encoding. Consequently, logical inference is superseded by neural simulation. Some remaining mysteries are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Knee-jerk Reflex Circuit.
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Figure 1: Knee-jerk Reflex Circuit.

Mentions: For concreteness, let’s start with a simple, well-known, neural circuit, the knee-jerk reflex shown in Figure 1. We are mainly concerned with the simplicity of this circuit; there is a single connection in the spinal cord that converts sensory input to action. The knee-jerk reflex is behaviorally important for correcting a potential stumble while walking upright. The doctor’s tap reduces tension in the upper leg muscle and this is detected by stretch receptor in the muscle spindle, sending neural spike signals to the spinal cord. The downward spike signals directly cause the muscle to contract and the leg to “jerk.” Not shown here are the many other circuit connections that support coordination of the two legs, voluntary leg jerking, etc.


Actionability and Simulation: No Representation without Communication
Knee-jerk Reflex Circuit.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036279&req=5

Figure 1: Knee-jerk Reflex Circuit.
Mentions: For concreteness, let’s start with a simple, well-known, neural circuit, the knee-jerk reflex shown in Figure 1. We are mainly concerned with the simplicity of this circuit; there is a single connection in the spinal cord that converts sensory input to action. The knee-jerk reflex is behaviorally important for correcting a potential stumble while walking upright. The doctor’s tap reduces tension in the upper leg muscle and this is detected by stretch receptor in the muscle spindle, sending neural spike signals to the spinal cord. The downward spike signals directly cause the muscle to contract and the leg to “jerk.” Not shown here are the many other circuit connections that support coordination of the two legs, voluntary leg jerking, etc.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

There remains considerable controversy about how the brain operates. This review focuses on brain activity rather than just structure and on concepts of action and actionability rather than truth conditions. Neural Communication is reviewed as a crucial aspect of neural encoding. Consequently, logical inference is superseded by neural simulation. Some remaining mysteries are discussed.

No MeSH data available.