Limits...
Development and characterization of fourteen novel microsatellite markers for the chestnut short-tailed fruit bat ( Carollia castanea ), and cross-amplification to related species

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Rapid anthropogenic land use change threatens the primary habitat of the Chestnut short-tailed bat (Carollia castanea) throughout much of its range. Information on population genetic structure can inform management strategies for this widespread frugivorous bat, and effective protection of C. castanea will also benefit the more than 20 mutualistic plant species of which this bat is the primary seed disperser. To facilitate understanding of population genetic structure in this species, fourteen novel microsatellite markers were developed using restriction-site-associated DNA libraries and Illumina sequencing and tested on 28 individuals from 13 locations in Costa Rica. These are the first microsatellite markers developed for C. castanea. All loci were polymorphic, with number of alleles ranging from 2–11 and average observed heterozygosity of 0.631. Markers were also cross-amplified in three additional frugivorous bat species threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation: Sowell’s short-tailed bat (Carollia sowelli), Seba’s short-tailed bat (Carollia perspicillata), and the Jamaican fruit bat (Artibeus jamaicensis), and 10, 11, and 8 were polymorphic, respectively.

No MeSH data available.


Baseline allele frequencies for all loci, averaged across all 20 sampled individuals of C. castanea.Loci 7–23 are shown in (A) and loci 24–30 in (B).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036068&req=5

fig-1: Baseline allele frequencies for all loci, averaged across all 20 sampled individuals of C. castanea.Loci 7–23 are shown in (A) and loci 24–30 in (B).

Mentions: Primer sequences, size range of amplification product, and multiplex assignment for each of the fourteen microsatellite loci are presented in Table 2. All loci were in HWE with the exception of CC-30 (p = 0.003) (Table 2), and all loci had allele frequencies of <1% except CC-24 (14%) and CC-30 (53%). The allele rate in CC-24 is moderate and this locus was not out of HWE, so we consider it a reliable marker for use in C. castanea. The marker CC-30 was significantly out of HWE and showed a fairly high allele rate in these analyses, so it is not likely that this marker will prove to be reliable for use in this species. Excluding these two potentially problematic loci, remaining loci had 2–11 alleles per locus, with an average observed heterozygosity of 0.631 (±0.227) (Table 2). These levels of polymorphism and heterozygosity are similar to those found by Bardeleben et al. (2007): the loci these authors cross-amplified from C. brevicauda to C. castanea showed 2–18 alleles per locus, with an average observed heterozygosity of 0.69. Calculation of allele frequencies across the study area revealed that loci CC-10 and CC-30 are the only two loci where a single allele has a frequency of greater than 0.7 (Fig. 1).


Development and characterization of fourteen novel microsatellite markers for the chestnut short-tailed fruit bat ( Carollia castanea ), and cross-amplification to related species
Baseline allele frequencies for all loci, averaged across all 20 sampled individuals of C. castanea.Loci 7–23 are shown in (A) and loci 24–30 in (B).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036068&req=5

fig-1: Baseline allele frequencies for all loci, averaged across all 20 sampled individuals of C. castanea.Loci 7–23 are shown in (A) and loci 24–30 in (B).
Mentions: Primer sequences, size range of amplification product, and multiplex assignment for each of the fourteen microsatellite loci are presented in Table 2. All loci were in HWE with the exception of CC-30 (p = 0.003) (Table 2), and all loci had allele frequencies of <1% except CC-24 (14%) and CC-30 (53%). The allele rate in CC-24 is moderate and this locus was not out of HWE, so we consider it a reliable marker for use in C. castanea. The marker CC-30 was significantly out of HWE and showed a fairly high allele rate in these analyses, so it is not likely that this marker will prove to be reliable for use in this species. Excluding these two potentially problematic loci, remaining loci had 2–11 alleles per locus, with an average observed heterozygosity of 0.631 (±0.227) (Table 2). These levels of polymorphism and heterozygosity are similar to those found by Bardeleben et al. (2007): the loci these authors cross-amplified from C. brevicauda to C. castanea showed 2–18 alleles per locus, with an average observed heterozygosity of 0.69. Calculation of allele frequencies across the study area revealed that loci CC-10 and CC-30 are the only two loci where a single allele has a frequency of greater than 0.7 (Fig. 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Rapid anthropogenic land use change threatens the primary habitat of the Chestnut short-tailed bat (Carollia castanea) throughout much of its range. Information on population genetic structure can inform management strategies for this widespread frugivorous bat, and effective protection of C. castanea will also benefit the more than 20 mutualistic plant species of which this bat is the primary seed disperser. To facilitate understanding of population genetic structure in this species, fourteen novel microsatellite markers were developed using restriction-site-associated DNA libraries and Illumina sequencing and tested on 28 individuals from 13 locations in Costa Rica. These are the first microsatellite markers developed for C. castanea. All loci were polymorphic, with number of alleles ranging from 2&ndash;11 and average observed heterozygosity of 0.631. Markers were also cross-amplified in three additional frugivorous bat species threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation: Sowell&rsquo;s short-tailed bat (Carollia sowelli), Seba&rsquo;s short-tailed bat (Carollia perspicillata), and the Jamaican fruit bat (Artibeus jamaicensis), and 10, 11, and 8 were polymorphic, respectively.

No MeSH data available.