Limits...
Follow-up after acute poisoning by substances of abuse: a prospective observational cohort study

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: To chart follow-up of patients after acute poisoning by substances of abuse, register whether patients referred to specialist health services attended, and whether patients contacted a general practitioner (GP) after the poisoning episode.

Design: Observational cohort study.

Setting: A primary care emergency outpatient clinic in Oslo, Norway.

Subjects: Patients ≥12 years treated for acute poisoning by substances of abuse were included consecutively from October 2011 to September 2012.

Main outcome measures: Follow-up initiated at discharge, proportion of cases in which referred patients attended within three months, and proportion of cases in which the patient consulted a GP the first month following discharge.

Results: There were 2343 episodes of acute poisoning by substances of abuse. In 391 (17%) cases the patient was hospitalised, including 49 (2%) in psychiatric wards. In 235 (10%) cases the patient was referred to specialist health services, in 91 (4%) advised to see their GP, in 82 (3%) to contact social services, in 74 (3%) allotted place in a homeless shelter, and in 93 (4%) other follow-up was initiated. In 1096 (47%) cases, the patient was discharged without follow-up, and in a further 324 (14%), the patient self-discharged. When referred to specialist health services, in 200/235 (85%) cases the patient attended within three months. Among all discharges, in 527/1952 (27%) cases the patient consulted a GP within one month. When advised to see their GP, in 45/91 (49%) cases the patient did.

Conclusion: Attendance was high for follow-up initiated after acute poisoning by substances of abuse.

Key points: Despite poor long-term prognosis, patients treated for acute poisoning by substances of abuse are frequently not referred to follow-up.

Key points: Nearly all patients referred to specialist health services attended, indicating the acute poisoning as an opportune moment for intervention.

Key points: Advising patients to contact their GP was significantly associated with patients consulting the GP, but few patients were so advised.

Key points: One out of three patients was discharged without follow-up, and there seems to be an unused potential for GP involvement.

Key points: One out of three patients was discharged without follow-up, and there seems to be an unused potential for GP involvement.

No MeSH data available.


Participants, inclusion, and exclusion.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036022&req=5

Figure 0001: Participants, inclusion, and exclusion.

Mentions: All patients 12 years and older treated at the OAEOC for an acute poisoning by substances of abuse were included. Patients treated for other conditions in addition to poisoning, were included if the poisoning itself was serious enough to warrant treatment or observation. Patients were included by the physician treating them. In addition, we systematically searched the electronic patient lists and included any eligible patients missed, hence not included at the time of the poisoning episode. Patients were excluded if they did not have a Norwegian national identity number. During the inclusion period, there were 3139 cases of acute poisoning (about 1.6% of all contacts at the OAEOC), yielding 2343 included cases in 1731 patients (Figure 1).


Follow-up after acute poisoning by substances of abuse: a prospective observational cohort study
Participants, inclusion, and exclusion.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036022&req=5

Figure 0001: Participants, inclusion, and exclusion.
Mentions: All patients 12 years and older treated at the OAEOC for an acute poisoning by substances of abuse were included. Patients treated for other conditions in addition to poisoning, were included if the poisoning itself was serious enough to warrant treatment or observation. Patients were included by the physician treating them. In addition, we systematically searched the electronic patient lists and included any eligible patients missed, hence not included at the time of the poisoning episode. Patients were excluded if they did not have a Norwegian national identity number. During the inclusion period, there were 3139 cases of acute poisoning (about 1.6% of all contacts at the OAEOC), yielding 2343 included cases in 1731 patients (Figure 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: To chart follow-up of patients after acute poisoning by substances of abuse, register whether patients referred to specialist health services attended, and whether patients contacted a general practitioner (GP) after the poisoning episode.

Design: Observational cohort study.

Setting: A primary care emergency outpatient clinic in Oslo, Norway.

Subjects: Patients ≥12 years treated for acute poisoning by substances of abuse were included consecutively from October 2011 to September 2012.

Main outcome measures: Follow-up initiated at discharge, proportion of cases in which referred patients attended within three months, and proportion of cases in which the patient consulted a GP the first month following discharge.

Results: There were 2343 episodes of acute poisoning by substances of abuse. In 391 (17%) cases the patient was hospitalised, including 49 (2%) in psychiatric wards. In 235 (10%) cases the patient was referred to specialist health services, in 91 (4%) advised to see their GP, in 82 (3%) to contact social services, in 74 (3%) allotted place in a homeless shelter, and in 93 (4%) other follow-up was initiated. In 1096 (47%) cases, the patient was discharged without follow-up, and in a further 324 (14%), the patient self-discharged. When referred to specialist health services, in 200/235 (85%) cases the patient attended within three months. Among all discharges, in 527/1952 (27%) cases the patient consulted a GP within one month. When advised to see their GP, in 45/91 (49%) cases the patient did.

Conclusion: Attendance was high for follow-up initiated after acute poisoning by substances of abuse.

Key points: Despite poor long-term prognosis, patients treated for acute poisoning by substances of abuse are frequently not referred to follow-up.

Key points: Nearly all patients referred to specialist health services attended, indicating the acute poisoning as an opportune moment for intervention.

Key points: Advising patients to contact their GP was significantly associated with patients consulting the GP, but few patients were so advised.

Key points: One out of three patients was discharged without follow-up, and there seems to be an unused potential for GP involvement.

Key points: One out of three patients was discharged without follow-up, and there seems to be an unused potential for GP involvement.

No MeSH data available.