Limits...
Cancer patients ’ use of primary care out-of-hours services: a cross-sectional study in Norway

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate how cancer patients in Norway use primary care out-of-hours (OOH) services and describe different contact types and procedures.

Design: A retrospective cross-sectional registry study using a billing registry data source.

Setting: Norwegian primary care OOH services in 2014.

Subjects: All patients’ contacts in OOH services in 2014. Cancer patients were identified by ICPC-2 diagnosis.

Main outcome measures: Frequency of cancer patients’ contacts with OOH services, contact types, diagnoses, procedures, and socio-demographic characteristics.

Results: In total, 5752 cancer patients had 20,220 contacts (1% of all) in OOH services. Half of the contacts were cancer related. Cancer in the digestive (22.9%) and respiratory (18.0%) systems were most frequent; and infection/fever (21.8%) and pain (13.6%) most frequent additional diagnoses. A total of 4170 patients had at least one cancer-related direct contact; of these, 64.5% had only one contact during the year. Cancer patients had more home visits and more physicians’ contact with municipal nursing services than other patients, but fewer consultations (p < 0.001). Patients in the least central municipalities had significantly more contacts than more central municipalities (p < 0.001).

Conclusion: There was no indication of overuse of OOH services by cancer patients in Norway, which could indicate good quality of cancer care in general.

Key points:   Many are concerned about unnecessary use of emergency medical services for non-urgent conditions.

Key points: • There was no indication of overuse of out-of-hours services by cancer patients in Norway.

Key points: • Cancer patients had relatively more home visits, physician’s contact with the municipal nursing service, and weekend contacts than other patients.

Key points: • Cancer patients in the least central municipalities had relatively more contacts with out-of-hours services than those in more central municipalities.

Key points: • Cancer patients in the least central municipalities had relatively more contacts with out-of-hours services than those in more central municipalities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cancer patients’ (n = 5752) relative distribution of contact types (both cancer related and contacts with other diagnoses) in out-of-hours services in 2014.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036012&req=5

Figure 0002: Cancer patients’ (n = 5752) relative distribution of contact types (both cancer related and contacts with other diagnoses) in out-of-hours services in 2014.

Mentions: There were 5752 patients with a cancer-related contact in the material. About 55.1% of the patients were male (mean age 70.1 years) and 44.9% female (mean age 67.5 years). A total of 4170 patients had at least one cancer-related direct contact (home visit or consultation). Out of these, 64.6% had only one contact with the OOH services, while 5.2% had five or more cancer-related contacts during the year. Additionally, 63.2% of the cancer patients also had contacts with other diagnoses, nearly half of these with at least one home visit or consultation. When looking at cancer-related contacts and contacts with other diagnoses together, about a quarter of the patients had only one contact with OOH services during the year, while another quarter had five or more contacts (Figure 2). As number of contacts increases, the relative share of consultations decreases.


Cancer patients ’ use of primary care out-of-hours services: a cross-sectional study in Norway
Cancer patients’ (n = 5752) relative distribution of contact types (both cancer related and contacts with other diagnoses) in out-of-hours services in 2014.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036012&req=5

Figure 0002: Cancer patients’ (n = 5752) relative distribution of contact types (both cancer related and contacts with other diagnoses) in out-of-hours services in 2014.
Mentions: There were 5752 patients with a cancer-related contact in the material. About 55.1% of the patients were male (mean age 70.1 years) and 44.9% female (mean age 67.5 years). A total of 4170 patients had at least one cancer-related direct contact (home visit or consultation). Out of these, 64.6% had only one contact with the OOH services, while 5.2% had five or more cancer-related contacts during the year. Additionally, 63.2% of the cancer patients also had contacts with other diagnoses, nearly half of these with at least one home visit or consultation. When looking at cancer-related contacts and contacts with other diagnoses together, about a quarter of the patients had only one contact with OOH services during the year, while another quarter had five or more contacts (Figure 2). As number of contacts increases, the relative share of consultations decreases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate how cancer patients in Norway use primary care out-of-hours (OOH) services and describe different contact types and procedures.

Design: A retrospective cross-sectional registry study using a billing registry data source.

Setting: Norwegian primary care OOH services in 2014.

Subjects: All patients’ contacts in OOH services in 2014. Cancer patients were identified by ICPC-2 diagnosis.

Main outcome measures: Frequency of cancer patients’ contacts with OOH services, contact types, diagnoses, procedures, and socio-demographic characteristics.

Results: In total, 5752 cancer patients had 20,220 contacts (1% of all) in OOH services. Half of the contacts were cancer related. Cancer in the digestive (22.9%) and respiratory (18.0%) systems were most frequent; and infection/fever (21.8%) and pain (13.6%) most frequent additional diagnoses. A total of 4170 patients had at least one cancer-related direct contact; of these, 64.5% had only one contact during the year. Cancer patients had more home visits and more physicians’ contact with municipal nursing services than other patients, but fewer consultations (p < 0.001). Patients in the least central municipalities had significantly more contacts than more central municipalities (p < 0.001).

Conclusion: There was no indication of overuse of OOH services by cancer patients in Norway, which could indicate good quality of cancer care in general.

Key points:   Many are concerned about unnecessary use of emergency medical services for non-urgent conditions.

Key points: • There was no indication of overuse of out-of-hours services by cancer patients in Norway.

Key points: • Cancer patients had relatively more home visits, physician’s contact with the municipal nursing service, and weekend contacts than other patients.

Key points: • Cancer patients in the least central municipalities had relatively more contacts with out-of-hours services than those in more central municipalities.

Key points: • Cancer patients in the least central municipalities had relatively more contacts with out-of-hours services than those in more central municipalities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus