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Textile Organic Electrochemical Transistors as a Platform for Wearable Biosensors

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The development of wearable chemical sensors is receiving a great deal of attention in view of non-invasive and continuous monitoring of physiological parameters in healthcare applications. This paper describes the development of a fully textile, wearable chemical sensor based on an organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) entirely made of conductive polymer (PEDOT:PSS). The active polymer patterns are deposited into the fabric by screen printing processes, thus allowing the device to actually “disappear” into it. We demonstrate the reliability of the proposed textile OECTs as a platform for developing chemical sensors capable to detect in real-time various redox active molecules (adrenaline, dopamine and ascorbic acid), by assessing their performance in two different experimental contexts: i) ideal operation conditions (i.e. totally dipped in an electrolyte solution); ii) real-life operation conditions (i.e. by sequentially adding few drops of electrolyte solution onto only one side of the textile sensor). The OECTs response has also been measured in artificial sweat, assessing how these sensors can be reliably used for the detection of biomarkers in body fluids. Finally, the very low operating potentials (<1 V) and absorbed power (~10−4 W) make the here described textile OECTs very appealing for portable and wearable applications.

No MeSH data available.


Device pictures and experimental setup.(A) Pictures of screen printed OECTs obtained in the conformation G1 (1) and G2 (2). (B) Scheme of OECT in G1 geometry. (C) Scheme of OECT in G2 geometry. (D) Scheme of experimental apparatus for G1 transistor. (E) Scheme of experimental apparatus for G2 transistor.
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f2: Device pictures and experimental setup.(A) Pictures of screen printed OECTs obtained in the conformation G1 (1) and G2 (2). (B) Scheme of OECT in G1 geometry. (C) Scheme of OECT in G2 geometry. (D) Scheme of experimental apparatus for G1 transistor. (E) Scheme of experimental apparatus for G2 transistor.

Mentions: The devices were prepared with two different geometries (G1 and G2) that are reported in Fig. 2. It is worthy to note that the whole OECT structure here presented is made by PEDOT:PSS and thus no metal electrodes are needed that could hinder an optimal conformability to flexible 3D structure of the fabric. The PEDOT:PSS patterns display a well-defined shape that is clearly visible onto the fabrics thanks to the typical blue color of PEDOT:PSS. The sheet resistance of PEDOT:PSS-modified textile resulted equal to 38 ± 7 Ω/□, and this value is much lower than the one of the pristine textile (3.2 ± 0.3 1010 Ω/□). This value is also lower than those reported in literature for conductive textiles (Table 1) that have been used for the production of OECTs. Such results indicate that the screen printing of PEDOT:PSS is a promising technique to deposit PEDOT:PSS on a textile and the performance are good enough to produce an OECT. Our conductive fabrics are also comparable with those used to realize amperometric sensors embedded in garments (see Table 1), suggesting that PEDOT:PSS modified textiles can be also used for this application. Such evidence is very important also for the operation of the OECT, because the sensing element of the transistor has a response that is ruled by the same chemical and physical parameters of the amperometric sensing process.


Textile Organic Electrochemical Transistors as a Platform for Wearable Biosensors
Device pictures and experimental setup.(A) Pictures of screen printed OECTs obtained in the conformation G1 (1) and G2 (2). (B) Scheme of OECT in G1 geometry. (C) Scheme of OECT in G2 geometry. (D) Scheme of experimental apparatus for G1 transistor. (E) Scheme of experimental apparatus for G2 transistor.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5035988&req=5

f2: Device pictures and experimental setup.(A) Pictures of screen printed OECTs obtained in the conformation G1 (1) and G2 (2). (B) Scheme of OECT in G1 geometry. (C) Scheme of OECT in G2 geometry. (D) Scheme of experimental apparatus for G1 transistor. (E) Scheme of experimental apparatus for G2 transistor.
Mentions: The devices were prepared with two different geometries (G1 and G2) that are reported in Fig. 2. It is worthy to note that the whole OECT structure here presented is made by PEDOT:PSS and thus no metal electrodes are needed that could hinder an optimal conformability to flexible 3D structure of the fabric. The PEDOT:PSS patterns display a well-defined shape that is clearly visible onto the fabrics thanks to the typical blue color of PEDOT:PSS. The sheet resistance of PEDOT:PSS-modified textile resulted equal to 38 ± 7 Ω/□, and this value is much lower than the one of the pristine textile (3.2 ± 0.3 1010 Ω/□). This value is also lower than those reported in literature for conductive textiles (Table 1) that have been used for the production of OECTs. Such results indicate that the screen printing of PEDOT:PSS is a promising technique to deposit PEDOT:PSS on a textile and the performance are good enough to produce an OECT. Our conductive fabrics are also comparable with those used to realize amperometric sensors embedded in garments (see Table 1), suggesting that PEDOT:PSS modified textiles can be also used for this application. Such evidence is very important also for the operation of the OECT, because the sensing element of the transistor has a response that is ruled by the same chemical and physical parameters of the amperometric sensing process.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The development of wearable chemical sensors is receiving a great deal of attention in view of non-invasive and continuous monitoring of physiological parameters in healthcare applications. This paper describes the development of a fully textile, wearable chemical sensor based on an organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) entirely made of conductive polymer (PEDOT:PSS). The active polymer patterns are deposited into the fabric by screen printing processes, thus allowing the device to actually “disappear” into it. We demonstrate the reliability of the proposed textile OECTs as a platform for developing chemical sensors capable to detect in real-time various redox active molecules (adrenaline, dopamine and ascorbic acid), by assessing their performance in two different experimental contexts: i) ideal operation conditions (i.e. totally dipped in an electrolyte solution); ii) real-life operation conditions (i.e. by sequentially adding few drops of electrolyte solution onto only one side of the textile sensor). The OECTs response has also been measured in artificial sweat, assessing how these sensors can be reliably used for the detection of biomarkers in body fluids. Finally, the very low operating potentials (<1 V) and absorbed power (~10−4 W) make the here described textile OECTs very appealing for portable and wearable applications.

No MeSH data available.