Limits...
Textile Organic Electrochemical Transistors as a Platform for Wearable Biosensors

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The development of wearable chemical sensors is receiving a great deal of attention in view of non-invasive and continuous monitoring of physiological parameters in healthcare applications. This paper describes the development of a fully textile, wearable chemical sensor based on an organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) entirely made of conductive polymer (PEDOT:PSS). The active polymer patterns are deposited into the fabric by screen printing processes, thus allowing the device to actually “disappear” into it. We demonstrate the reliability of the proposed textile OECTs as a platform for developing chemical sensors capable to detect in real-time various redox active molecules (adrenaline, dopamine and ascorbic acid), by assessing their performance in two different experimental contexts: i) ideal operation conditions (i.e. totally dipped in an electrolyte solution); ii) real-life operation conditions (i.e. by sequentially adding few drops of electrolyte solution onto only one side of the textile sensor). The OECTs response has also been measured in artificial sweat, assessing how these sensors can be reliably used for the detection of biomarkers in body fluids. Finally, the very low operating potentials (<1 V) and absorbed power (~10−4 W) make the here described textile OECTs very appealing for portable and wearable applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

OECT working principle.Scheme of an OECT (A) operating in conditions of low (B) and high (C) conductivity of the channel.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5035988&req=5

f1: OECT working principle.Scheme of an OECT (A) operating in conditions of low (B) and high (C) conductivity of the channel.

Mentions: Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) are devices2526 that exhibit features that are very fascinating for the design of wearable sensors. An OECT is composed by a stripe of conductive polymer that works as a channel, and by another electrode that works as a gate (Fig. 1A). Between them is placed an electrolyte solution. The channel current can be modulated by the gate voltage through electrochemical reactions that change the charge-carrier concentration in the transistor channel material and, consequently, the conductivity of the channel (Fig. 1B,C). Since the transistor architecture is the combination of a sensitive element and an amplifier, OECTs directly amplify the electrochemical signal. Moreover, OECTs do not require a three electrode setup, making these device and their readout electronics simpler than the potentiostats that are commonly used as electrochemical sensors. Therefore the OECT structure can be easily embedded in a flexible fabric and a 3D structured substrate, because it does not require a metal reference electrode and a counter electrode that are required by standard electrochemical sensors. Finally, the electrochemical processes take place at potentials lower than 1 V, thus allowing for very low power supply and portable devices. The literature clearly shows the potentiality of OECTs as sensors. In fact, several no-textile OECTs, all endowed with a metal gate electrode, have been developed in order to measure the concentration of different chemical compounds such as cations2728, dopamine29, adrenaline30, ascorbic acid31 and glucose323334.


Textile Organic Electrochemical Transistors as a Platform for Wearable Biosensors
OECT working principle.Scheme of an OECT (A) operating in conditions of low (B) and high (C) conductivity of the channel.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5035988&req=5

f1: OECT working principle.Scheme of an OECT (A) operating in conditions of low (B) and high (C) conductivity of the channel.
Mentions: Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) are devices2526 that exhibit features that are very fascinating for the design of wearable sensors. An OECT is composed by a stripe of conductive polymer that works as a channel, and by another electrode that works as a gate (Fig. 1A). Between them is placed an electrolyte solution. The channel current can be modulated by the gate voltage through electrochemical reactions that change the charge-carrier concentration in the transistor channel material and, consequently, the conductivity of the channel (Fig. 1B,C). Since the transistor architecture is the combination of a sensitive element and an amplifier, OECTs directly amplify the electrochemical signal. Moreover, OECTs do not require a three electrode setup, making these device and their readout electronics simpler than the potentiostats that are commonly used as electrochemical sensors. Therefore the OECT structure can be easily embedded in a flexible fabric and a 3D structured substrate, because it does not require a metal reference electrode and a counter electrode that are required by standard electrochemical sensors. Finally, the electrochemical processes take place at potentials lower than 1 V, thus allowing for very low power supply and portable devices. The literature clearly shows the potentiality of OECTs as sensors. In fact, several no-textile OECTs, all endowed with a metal gate electrode, have been developed in order to measure the concentration of different chemical compounds such as cations2728, dopamine29, adrenaline30, ascorbic acid31 and glucose323334.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The development of wearable chemical sensors is receiving a great deal of attention in view of non-invasive and continuous monitoring of physiological parameters in healthcare applications. This paper describes the development of a fully textile, wearable chemical sensor based on an organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) entirely made of conductive polymer (PEDOT:PSS). The active polymer patterns are deposited into the fabric by screen printing processes, thus allowing the device to actually “disappear” into it. We demonstrate the reliability of the proposed textile OECTs as a platform for developing chemical sensors capable to detect in real-time various redox active molecules (adrenaline, dopamine and ascorbic acid), by assessing their performance in two different experimental contexts: i) ideal operation conditions (i.e. totally dipped in an electrolyte solution); ii) real-life operation conditions (i.e. by sequentially adding few drops of electrolyte solution onto only one side of the textile sensor). The OECTs response has also been measured in artificial sweat, assessing how these sensors can be reliably used for the detection of biomarkers in body fluids. Finally, the very low operating potentials (<1 V) and absorbed power (~10−4 W) make the here described textile OECTs very appealing for portable and wearable applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus