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A Good Death? Report of the Second Newcastle Meeting on Laboratory Animal Euthanasia

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Simple summary: Millions of laboratory animals are killed each year worldwide. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding what methods of killing are humane for many species and stages of development. This report summarises research findings and discussions from an international meeting of experts and stakeholders, with recommendations to inform good practice for humane killing of mice, rats and zebrafish. It provides additional guidance and perspectives for researchers designing projects that involve euthanasing animals, researchers studying aspects of humane killing, euthanasia device manufacturers, regulators, and institutional ethics or animal care and use committees that wish to review local practice.

Abstract: Millions of laboratory animals are killed each year worldwide. There is an ethical, and in many countries also a legal, imperative to ensure those deaths cause minimal suffering. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding what methods of killing are humane for many species and stages of development. In 2013, an international group of researchers and stakeholders met at Newcastle University, United Kingdom to discuss the latest research and which methods could currently be considered most humane for the most commonly used laboratory species (mice, rats and zebrafish). They also discussed factors to consider when making decisions about appropriate techniques for particular species and projects, and priorities for further research. This report summarises the research findings and discussions, with recommendations to help inform good practice for humane killing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The induction of loss of consciousness during 20% per minute filling with CO2. Time line for loss of consciousness in rats exposed to CO2 at 20% chamber volume per minute. Animals lose consciousness after approximately 156 s. Bars below the x-axis indicate periods where the animals would be conscious or unconscious. Shaded area shows the likely time/concentration where CO2 could cause pain (which occurs after loss consciousness in this case). Levels above 5% may cause anxiety and include a significant duration where the animal would still be conscious.
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animals-06-00050-f004: The induction of loss of consciousness during 20% per minute filling with CO2. Time line for loss of consciousness in rats exposed to CO2 at 20% chamber volume per minute. Animals lose consciousness after approximately 156 s. Bars below the x-axis indicate periods where the animals would be conscious or unconscious. Shaded area shows the likely time/concentration where CO2 could cause pain (which occurs after loss consciousness in this case). Levels above 5% may cause anxiety and include a significant duration where the animal would still be conscious.

Mentions: There are long-standing concerns that CO2 killing would be painful for animals [25]; for those placed in a pre-filled chamber this would certainly be the case, but using gradual fill probably avoids causing pain. For example, with a fill rate of 20% chamber volume per minute, rats lose consciousness at 156 ± 5 s (Golledge, unpubl. obs.), at which point the concentration of CO2 is 39%, which is likely to be before the gas reaches levels liable to cause pain (Figure 4).


A Good Death? Report of the Second Newcastle Meeting on Laboratory Animal Euthanasia
The induction of loss of consciousness during 20% per minute filling with CO2. Time line for loss of consciousness in rats exposed to CO2 at 20% chamber volume per minute. Animals lose consciousness after approximately 156 s. Bars below the x-axis indicate periods where the animals would be conscious or unconscious. Shaded area shows the likely time/concentration where CO2 could cause pain (which occurs after loss consciousness in this case). Levels above 5% may cause anxiety and include a significant duration where the animal would still be conscious.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5035945&req=5

animals-06-00050-f004: The induction of loss of consciousness during 20% per minute filling with CO2. Time line for loss of consciousness in rats exposed to CO2 at 20% chamber volume per minute. Animals lose consciousness after approximately 156 s. Bars below the x-axis indicate periods where the animals would be conscious or unconscious. Shaded area shows the likely time/concentration where CO2 could cause pain (which occurs after loss consciousness in this case). Levels above 5% may cause anxiety and include a significant duration where the animal would still be conscious.
Mentions: There are long-standing concerns that CO2 killing would be painful for animals [25]; for those placed in a pre-filled chamber this would certainly be the case, but using gradual fill probably avoids causing pain. For example, with a fill rate of 20% chamber volume per minute, rats lose consciousness at 156 ± 5 s (Golledge, unpubl. obs.), at which point the concentration of CO2 is 39%, which is likely to be before the gas reaches levels liable to cause pain (Figure 4).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Simple summary: Millions of laboratory animals are killed each year worldwide. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding what methods of killing are humane for many species and stages of development. This report summarises research findings and discussions from an international meeting of experts and stakeholders, with recommendations to inform good practice for humane killing of mice, rats and zebrafish. It provides additional guidance and perspectives for researchers designing projects that involve euthanasing animals, researchers studying aspects of humane killing, euthanasia device manufacturers, regulators, and institutional ethics or animal care and use committees that wish to review local practice.

Abstract: Millions of laboratory animals are killed each year worldwide. There is an ethical, and in many countries also a legal, imperative to ensure those deaths cause minimal suffering. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding what methods of killing are humane for many species and stages of development. In 2013, an international group of researchers and stakeholders met at Newcastle University, United Kingdom to discuss the latest research and which methods could currently be considered most humane for the most commonly used laboratory species (mice, rats and zebrafish). They also discussed factors to consider when making decisions about appropriate techniques for particular species and projects, and priorities for further research. This report summarises the research findings and discussions, with recommendations to help inform good practice for humane killing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus