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A Good Death? Report of the Second Newcastle Meeting on Laboratory Animal Euthanasia

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Simple summary: Millions of laboratory animals are killed each year worldwide. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding what methods of killing are humane for many species and stages of development. This report summarises research findings and discussions from an international meeting of experts and stakeholders, with recommendations to inform good practice for humane killing of mice, rats and zebrafish. It provides additional guidance and perspectives for researchers designing projects that involve euthanasing animals, researchers studying aspects of humane killing, euthanasia device manufacturers, regulators, and institutional ethics or animal care and use committees that wish to review local practice.

Abstract: Millions of laboratory animals are killed each year worldwide. There is an ethical, and in many countries also a legal, imperative to ensure those deaths cause minimal suffering. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding what methods of killing are humane for many species and stages of development. In 2013, an international group of researchers and stakeholders met at Newcastle University, United Kingdom to discuss the latest research and which methods could currently be considered most humane for the most commonly used laboratory species (mice, rats and zebrafish). They also discussed factors to consider when making decisions about appropriate techniques for particular species and projects, and priorities for further research. This report summarises the research findings and discussions, with recommendations to help inform good practice for humane killing.

No MeSH data available.


Meeting participants’ responses to the questions: “Which methods do you use to kill mice/rats?”.
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animals-06-00050-f001: Meeting participants’ responses to the questions: “Which methods do you use to kill mice/rats?”.

Mentions: Demographic information, participants’ views and information on current practices were obtained using an interactive, electronic polling system (Turning Technologies, LLC). The audience of 90 participants included researchers, veterinarians, facility managers, animal technologists, research regulators, and staff of animal welfare and 3Rs organisations. Most participants worked within academic institutions. Two thirds were based in the UK and one sixth in other EU member states, with the remainder from the USA, Canada, Japan and New Zealand. Four fifths of the audience were directly involved in the euthanasia of animals used in research; mostly rats and mice but also fish and birds. Participants directly involved in euthanasia reported the use of a variety of techniques for mice and rats (Figure 1) and fish (Figure 2).


A Good Death? Report of the Second Newcastle Meeting on Laboratory Animal Euthanasia
Meeting participants’ responses to the questions: “Which methods do you use to kill mice/rats?”.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5035945&req=5

animals-06-00050-f001: Meeting participants’ responses to the questions: “Which methods do you use to kill mice/rats?”.
Mentions: Demographic information, participants’ views and information on current practices were obtained using an interactive, electronic polling system (Turning Technologies, LLC). The audience of 90 participants included researchers, veterinarians, facility managers, animal technologists, research regulators, and staff of animal welfare and 3Rs organisations. Most participants worked within academic institutions. Two thirds were based in the UK and one sixth in other EU member states, with the remainder from the USA, Canada, Japan and New Zealand. Four fifths of the audience were directly involved in the euthanasia of animals used in research; mostly rats and mice but also fish and birds. Participants directly involved in euthanasia reported the use of a variety of techniques for mice and rats (Figure 1) and fish (Figure 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Simple summary: Millions of laboratory animals are killed each year worldwide. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding what methods of killing are humane for many species and stages of development. This report summarises research findings and discussions from an international meeting of experts and stakeholders, with recommendations to inform good practice for humane killing of mice, rats and zebrafish. It provides additional guidance and perspectives for researchers designing projects that involve euthanasing animals, researchers studying aspects of humane killing, euthanasia device manufacturers, regulators, and institutional ethics or animal care and use committees that wish to review local practice.

Abstract: Millions of laboratory animals are killed each year worldwide. There is an ethical, and in many countries also a legal, imperative to ensure those deaths cause minimal suffering. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding what methods of killing are humane for many species and stages of development. In 2013, an international group of researchers and stakeholders met at Newcastle University, United Kingdom to discuss the latest research and which methods could currently be considered most humane for the most commonly used laboratory species (mice, rats and zebrafish). They also discussed factors to consider when making decisions about appropriate techniques for particular species and projects, and priorities for further research. This report summarises the research findings and discussions, with recommendations to help inform good practice for humane killing.

No MeSH data available.