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Novel highly divergent reassortant bat rotaviruses in Cameroon, without evidence of zoonosis

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Bats are an important reservoir for zoonotic viruses. To date, only three RVA strains have been reported in bats in Kenya and China. In the current study we investigated the genetic diversity of RVAs in fecal samples from 87 straw-colored fruit bats living in close contact with humans in Cameroon using viral metagenomics. Five (near) complete RVA genomes were obtained. A single RVA strain showed a partial relationship with the Kenyan bat RVA strain, whereas the other strains were completely novel. Only the VP7 and VP4 genes showed significant variability, indicating the occurrence of frequent reassortment events. Comparing these bat RVA strains with currently used human RVA screening primers indicated that most of the novel VP7 and VP4 segments would not be detected in routine epidemiological screening studies. Therefore, novel consensus screening primers were developed and used to screen samples from infants with gastroenteritis living in close proximity with the studied bat population. Although RVA infections were identified in 36% of the infants, there was no evidence of zoonosis. This study identified multiple novel bat RVA strains, but further epidemiological studies in humans will have to assess if these viruses have the potential to cause gastroenteritis in humans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of study site (South West Region, Cameroon).The number of bat (black filled circles) and human (red filled circles) samples are indicated. Maps were created in R40 (version 3.2.3), using the raster package41 and the default plotting packages.
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f1: Map of study site (South West Region, Cameroon).The number of bat (black filled circles) and human (red filled circles) samples are indicated. Maps were created in R40 (version 3.2.3), using the raster package41 and the default plotting packages.

Mentions: To further study the genomics of RVA in bats and their zoonotic potential in humans, we screened stool samples of straw-colored fruit bats (Eidolon helvum) living in close proximity with humans in the South West Region of Cameroon (Fig. 1), as well as samples from infants with gastroenteritis. Our choice of this region is due to the fact that bats are considered a delicacy and the species sampled are the most commonly eaten bat species in these localities.


Novel highly divergent reassortant bat rotaviruses in Cameroon, without evidence of zoonosis
Map of study site (South West Region, Cameroon).The number of bat (black filled circles) and human (red filled circles) samples are indicated. Maps were created in R40 (version 3.2.3), using the raster package41 and the default plotting packages.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5035928&req=5

f1: Map of study site (South West Region, Cameroon).The number of bat (black filled circles) and human (red filled circles) samples are indicated. Maps were created in R40 (version 3.2.3), using the raster package41 and the default plotting packages.
Mentions: To further study the genomics of RVA in bats and their zoonotic potential in humans, we screened stool samples of straw-colored fruit bats (Eidolon helvum) living in close proximity with humans in the South West Region of Cameroon (Fig. 1), as well as samples from infants with gastroenteritis. Our choice of this region is due to the fact that bats are considered a delicacy and the species sampled are the most commonly eaten bat species in these localities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Bats are an important reservoir for zoonotic viruses. To date, only three RVA strains have been reported in bats in Kenya and China. In the current study we investigated the genetic diversity of RVAs in fecal samples from 87 straw-colored fruit bats living in close contact with humans in Cameroon using viral metagenomics. Five (near) complete RVA genomes were obtained. A single RVA strain showed a partial relationship with the Kenyan bat RVA strain, whereas the other strains were completely novel. Only the VP7 and VP4 genes showed significant variability, indicating the occurrence of frequent reassortment events. Comparing these bat RVA strains with currently used human RVA screening primers indicated that most of the novel VP7 and VP4 segments would not be detected in routine epidemiological screening studies. Therefore, novel consensus screening primers were developed and used to screen samples from infants with gastroenteritis living in close proximity with the studied bat population. Although RVA infections were identified in 36% of the infants, there was no evidence of zoonosis. This study identified multiple novel bat RVA strains, but further epidemiological studies in humans will have to assess if these viruses have the potential to cause gastroenteritis in humans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus