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A new intervention for people with borderline personality disorder who are also parents: a pilot study of clinician acceptability

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Engaging parents who have a personality disorder in interventions designed to protect children from the extremes of the disorder supports both parenting skills and healthy child development. In line with evidence-based guidelines, a ‘Parenting with Personality Disorder’ brief intervention was developed, focusing on child safety, effective communication and parenting strategies.

Method: Ratings of acceptability for the brief intervention model were given by 168 mental health clinicians who attended training. Changes in clinician attitudes, knowledge and skills were also assessed following training.

Results: Providing clinicians treating personality disorder clients with additional skills to address parenting was well received and filled a gap in service provision. Clinicians reported improvements in clinical skills, knowledge, willingness and confidence to intervene in parenting issues with clients. Qualitative responses endorsed three major modes of learning: case study analysis, reflective learning activities, and skills-based intervention practices.

Conclusions: Current treatment guidelines emphasise addressing parenting, but no evidence-based therapy includes specific parenting skills. This brief intervention model improved skills, efficacy and willingness to intervene. This approach can be readily added to current evidence-based therapy protocols and promises to improve client functioning and protect children from the extremes of the disorder. Clinical trials are now required to validate the approach in the field.

No MeSH data available.


Leximancer concept map of clinician identified core features of the brief intervention model (n = 165)
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Fig2: Leximancer concept map of clinician identified core features of the brief intervention model (n = 165)

Mentions: A manually seeded Leximancer concept map (Fig. 2) was generated based on identified themes and selected key words in the Nvivo thematic analysis. The concept map (Fig. 2) shows the relationship between the main factors identified by participants as being important for promoting engagement with the brief intervention content and resources. Interpretation of the concept map was made with consideration of several factors: (i) the size of the dots– with larger dots indicating greater occurrence; (ii) the distance between the concepts – reflects how closely the concepts were used together in the text; (iii) familiarity with the text – understanding and familiarity in which the concepts were used in the raw data [30]. Interpretation was made in collaboration with the full research team.Fig. 2


A new intervention for people with borderline personality disorder who are also parents: a pilot study of clinician acceptability
Leximancer concept map of clinician identified core features of the brief intervention model (n = 165)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5017053&req=5

Fig2: Leximancer concept map of clinician identified core features of the brief intervention model (n = 165)
Mentions: A manually seeded Leximancer concept map (Fig. 2) was generated based on identified themes and selected key words in the Nvivo thematic analysis. The concept map (Fig. 2) shows the relationship between the main factors identified by participants as being important for promoting engagement with the brief intervention content and resources. Interpretation of the concept map was made with consideration of several factors: (i) the size of the dots– with larger dots indicating greater occurrence; (ii) the distance between the concepts – reflects how closely the concepts were used together in the text; (iii) familiarity with the text – understanding and familiarity in which the concepts were used in the raw data [30]. Interpretation was made in collaboration with the full research team.Fig. 2

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Engaging parents who have a personality disorder in interventions designed to protect children from the extremes of the disorder supports both parenting skills and healthy child development. In line with evidence-based guidelines, a ‘Parenting with Personality Disorder’ brief intervention was developed, focusing on child safety, effective communication and parenting strategies.

Method: Ratings of acceptability for the brief intervention model were given by 168 mental health clinicians who attended training. Changes in clinician attitudes, knowledge and skills were also assessed following training.

Results: Providing clinicians treating personality disorder clients with additional skills to address parenting was well received and filled a gap in service provision. Clinicians reported improvements in clinical skills, knowledge, willingness and confidence to intervene in parenting issues with clients. Qualitative responses endorsed three major modes of learning: case study analysis, reflective learning activities, and skills-based intervention practices.

Conclusions: Current treatment guidelines emphasise addressing parenting, but no evidence-based therapy includes specific parenting skills. This brief intervention model improved skills, efficacy and willingness to intervene. This approach can be readily added to current evidence-based therapy protocols and promises to improve client functioning and protect children from the extremes of the disorder. Clinical trials are now required to validate the approach in the field.

No MeSH data available.