Limits...
Dolutegravir(DTG, S/GSK1349572) combined with other ARTs is superior to RAL- or EFV-based regimens for treatment of HIV-1 infection: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The first-generation integrase inhibitors (INIs) raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG) have shown efficacy against HIV infection, but they have the limitations of once-more daily dosing and extensive cross-resistance. Dolutegravir (DTG, S/GSK1349572), a second-generation drug that overcomes such shortcomings, is under spotlight. The purpose of this study is to review the evidence for DTG use in clinical settings, including its efficacy and safety.

Methods: PubMed, EMbase, Ovid, Web of Science, Science Direct, and related websites were screened from establishment until July 2013, and scientific meeting proceedings were manually searched. Two reviewers independently screened 118 citations repeatedly to identify randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy and safety of DTG-based regimen with those of RAL- or elvitegravir-based regimens. Using the selected studies with comparable outcome measures and indications, we performed a meta-analysis based on modified intention-to-treat (mITT), on-treatment (OT), and as-treated (AT) virological outcome data. Independent data extraction and quality assessment were conducted.

Results: Four unique studies were included with the use of DTG in antiretroviral therapy-naive patients. In therapy-naive patients, DTG combined with abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC) or tenofovir/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) resulted in a significantly better virological outcome with a mITT relative risk (RR)of 1.07 (95 % confidence interval (95 % CI 1.03–1.12). Evidence further supported use of DTG had a better virological suppression in the 50 mg once daily group (mITT RR 1.07; 95 % CI 1.03–1.12) as well as in the sub-analysis in dolutegravir/efavirenz(DTG/EFV) and dolutegravir/raltegravir (DTG/RAL) groups (RR 1.09, 95 % CI 1.03–1.15; RR 1.06, 95 % CI 0.98–1.15, respectively). In the matter of safety of DTG-based regimen, the risk of any event was RR 0.98 (95 % CI 0.94–1.01), the risk of serious adverse events (AEs) was RR 0.84 (95 % CI 0.62–1.15), and the risk of drug-related serious AEs was RR 0.33 (95 % CI 0.13–0.79).

Conclusion: In general, DTG 50 mg given once daily combined with an active background drug is a better choice in terms of both efficacy and safety.

No MeSH data available.


Literature search and study selection
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016965&req=5

Fig1: Literature search and study selection

Mentions: The study flow diagram is described in Fig. 1.Fig. 1


Dolutegravir(DTG, S/GSK1349572) combined with other ARTs is superior to RAL- or EFV-based regimens for treatment of HIV-1 infection: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
Literature search and study selection
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016965&req=5

Fig1: Literature search and study selection
Mentions: The study flow diagram is described in Fig. 1.Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The first-generation integrase inhibitors (INIs) raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG) have shown efficacy against HIV infection, but they have the limitations of once-more daily dosing and extensive cross-resistance. Dolutegravir (DTG, S/GSK1349572), a second-generation drug that overcomes such shortcomings, is under spotlight. The purpose of this study is to review the evidence for DTG use in clinical settings, including its efficacy and safety.

Methods: PubMed, EMbase, Ovid, Web of Science, Science Direct, and related websites were screened from establishment until July 2013, and scientific meeting proceedings were manually searched. Two reviewers independently screened 118 citations repeatedly to identify randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy and safety of DTG-based regimen with those of RAL- or elvitegravir-based regimens. Using the selected studies with comparable outcome measures and indications, we performed a meta-analysis based on modified intention-to-treat (mITT), on-treatment (OT), and as-treated (AT) virological outcome data. Independent data extraction and quality assessment were conducted.

Results: Four unique studies were included with the use of DTG in antiretroviral therapy-naive patients. In therapy-naive patients, DTG combined with abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC) or tenofovir/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) resulted in a significantly better virological outcome with a mITT relative risk (RR)of 1.07 (95 % confidence interval (95 % CI 1.03–1.12). Evidence further supported use of DTG had a better virological suppression in the 50 mg once daily group (mITT RR 1.07; 95 % CI 1.03–1.12) as well as in the sub-analysis in dolutegravir/efavirenz(DTG/EFV) and dolutegravir/raltegravir (DTG/RAL) groups (RR 1.09, 95 % CI 1.03–1.15; RR 1.06, 95 % CI 0.98–1.15, respectively). In the matter of safety of DTG-based regimen, the risk of any event was RR 0.98 (95 % CI 0.94–1.01), the risk of serious adverse events (AEs) was RR 0.84 (95 % CI 0.62–1.15), and the risk of drug-related serious AEs was RR 0.33 (95 % CI 0.13–0.79).

Conclusion: In general, DTG 50 mg given once daily combined with an active background drug is a better choice in terms of both efficacy and safety.

No MeSH data available.