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Ankle impingement

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ABSTRACT

Ankle impingement is a syndrome that encompasses a wide range of anterior and posterior joint pathology involving both osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. In this review, the etiology, pathoanatomy, diagnostic workup, and treatment options for both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A lateral radiograph demonstrates a large os trigonum
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Fig2: A lateral radiograph demonstrates a large os trigonum

Mentions: Pathology associated with the lateral (trigonal) process of the posterior talus is the most common cause of posterior impingement (Fig. 1). Anatomic variants of this structure have been well described. A Stieda process refers to an elongated tubercle. An os trigonum may represent failure of fusion of a secondary ossification center to the talar body, although this structure has been heavily debated in the orthopedic and radiologic literature. Impingement related to the trigonal process can result from acute fracture, chronic injury due to repetitive microtrauma, or mechanical irritation of the surrounding soft tissues [24] (Fig. 2).Fig. 1


Ankle impingement
A lateral radiograph demonstrates a large os trigonum
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016963&req=5

Fig2: A lateral radiograph demonstrates a large os trigonum
Mentions: Pathology associated with the lateral (trigonal) process of the posterior talus is the most common cause of posterior impingement (Fig. 1). Anatomic variants of this structure have been well described. A Stieda process refers to an elongated tubercle. An os trigonum may represent failure of fusion of a secondary ossification center to the talar body, although this structure has been heavily debated in the orthopedic and radiologic literature. Impingement related to the trigonal process can result from acute fracture, chronic injury due to repetitive microtrauma, or mechanical irritation of the surrounding soft tissues [24] (Fig. 2).Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Ankle impingement is a syndrome that encompasses a wide range of anterior and posterior joint pathology involving both osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. In this review, the etiology, pathoanatomy, diagnostic workup, and treatment options for both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus