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Taking a holistic approach to managing difficult stress fractures

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Stress fractures and other bony stress injuries occur along a spectrum of severity which can impact treatment and prognosis. When treating these injuries, it should be borne in mind that no two stress fractures behave exactly alike. Given that they are not a consistent injury, standardized treatment protocols can be challenging to develop. Treatment should be individualized to the patient or athlete, the causative activity, the anatomical site, and the severity of the injury. A holistic approach to the treatment of the most difficult stress fractures should be taken by orthopedists and sports medicine specialists. This approach is necessary to obtain optimal outcomes, minimize loss of fitness and time away from sports participation, and decrease the risk of recurrence.

No MeSH data available.


Running gait evaluation performed via aquatic treadmill in a male distance runner
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Fig7: Running gait evaluation performed via aquatic treadmill in a male distance runner

Mentions: A recent study of Division I collegiate track and field athletes indicated that expected to return to unrestricted training and competition ranged from 11 to 17 weeks [18]. Time to return varied linearly dependent on severity grade based on the Kaeding-Miller classification system. Criteria for allowing an athlete to return should include complete resolution of symptoms with activities of daily living, radiographic evidence of healing, no tenderness to palpation at the injury site, and optimization of the athlete’s nutritional, biomechanical, hormonal, and psychological status [4]. Recently, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (iDEXA) has been suggested to assure optimal lean to non-lean mass has been established and is currently under investigation to determine its ability to decrease future stress fracture risk. Training progression includes resistance training to optimize muscle mass along with the use of low-impact training options. Stationary biking, elliptical trainer, aquatic treadmill (Fig. 7), and suspended treadmill (Alter G) are utilized to maintain fitness as land running and participation in the causative activity are gradually increased.Fig. 7


Taking a holistic approach to managing difficult stress fractures
Running gait evaluation performed via aquatic treadmill in a male distance runner
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016928&req=5

Fig7: Running gait evaluation performed via aquatic treadmill in a male distance runner
Mentions: A recent study of Division I collegiate track and field athletes indicated that expected to return to unrestricted training and competition ranged from 11 to 17 weeks [18]. Time to return varied linearly dependent on severity grade based on the Kaeding-Miller classification system. Criteria for allowing an athlete to return should include complete resolution of symptoms with activities of daily living, radiographic evidence of healing, no tenderness to palpation at the injury site, and optimization of the athlete’s nutritional, biomechanical, hormonal, and psychological status [4]. Recently, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (iDEXA) has been suggested to assure optimal lean to non-lean mass has been established and is currently under investigation to determine its ability to decrease future stress fracture risk. Training progression includes resistance training to optimize muscle mass along with the use of low-impact training options. Stationary biking, elliptical trainer, aquatic treadmill (Fig. 7), and suspended treadmill (Alter G) are utilized to maintain fitness as land running and participation in the causative activity are gradually increased.Fig. 7

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Stress fractures and other bony stress injuries occur along a spectrum of severity which can impact treatment and prognosis. When treating these injuries, it should be borne in mind that no two stress fractures behave exactly alike. Given that they are not a consistent injury, standardized treatment protocols can be challenging to develop. Treatment should be individualized to the patient or athlete, the causative activity, the anatomical site, and the severity of the injury. A holistic approach to the treatment of the most difficult stress fractures should be taken by orthopedists and sports medicine specialists. This approach is necessary to obtain optimal outcomes, minimize loss of fitness and time away from sports participation, and decrease the risk of recurrence.

No MeSH data available.