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Posterior meniscal root injuries

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Meniscal root tears (MRTs) are defined as radial tears within 1 cm of the meniscal root insertion, or an avulsion of the insertion of the meniscus. These injuries change joint loading due to failure of the meniscus to convert axial loads into hoop stresses, resulting in joint overloading and degenerative changes in the knee. Meniscal root repair is recommended in patients without advanced osteoarthritis (Outerbridge 3–4), in order to restore joint congruence and loading and therefore to avoid the long-term effect of joint overloading. Several techniques have been described. Improved knee function has been reported after meniscal root repair, but there are still conflicting reports on whether surgical treatment can prevent osteoarthritis.

No MeSH data available.


Steps taken during arthroscopic repair of the posterior medial meniscus radial root (left knee). A. Radial root tear. B. Probing of root tear through posteromedial knee portal cannula. C. Placement of shuttle suture device through body of root tear. D. Transosseous pullout repair of root tear. E. Pullout sutures tied over a button on the anteromedial tibia. Reprinted with permission from Bhatia et al. (2014).
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Figure 0006: Steps taken during arthroscopic repair of the posterior medial meniscus radial root (left knee). A. Radial root tear. B. Probing of root tear through posteromedial knee portal cannula. C. Placement of shuttle suture device through body of root tear. D. Transosseous pullout repair of root tear. E. Pullout sutures tied over a button on the anteromedial tibia. Reprinted with permission from Bhatia et al. (2014).

Mentions: Several authors have described transosseous repair techniques, with each involving the passing of sutures through the meniscal root and tunnels in the proximal tibia. After passing through tibial tunnels, the sutures are then tied over a bone bridge or a post (Raustol et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006, Ahn et al. 2007, Nicholas et al. 2009). Our preferred technique for fixation of posterior horn meniscal root tear involves 2 simple sutures in the meniscal root passed through 2 tunnels in the proximal tibia and tied over a cortical button (Figures 6 and 7).


Posterior meniscal root injuries
Steps taken during arthroscopic repair of the posterior medial meniscus radial root (left knee). A. Radial root tear. B. Probing of root tear through posteromedial knee portal cannula. C. Placement of shuttle suture device through body of root tear. D. Transosseous pullout repair of root tear. E. Pullout sutures tied over a button on the anteromedial tibia. Reprinted with permission from Bhatia et al. (2014).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016902&req=5

Figure 0006: Steps taken during arthroscopic repair of the posterior medial meniscus radial root (left knee). A. Radial root tear. B. Probing of root tear through posteromedial knee portal cannula. C. Placement of shuttle suture device through body of root tear. D. Transosseous pullout repair of root tear. E. Pullout sutures tied over a button on the anteromedial tibia. Reprinted with permission from Bhatia et al. (2014).
Mentions: Several authors have described transosseous repair techniques, with each involving the passing of sutures through the meniscal root and tunnels in the proximal tibia. After passing through tibial tunnels, the sutures are then tied over a bone bridge or a post (Raustol et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006, Ahn et al. 2007, Nicholas et al. 2009). Our preferred technique for fixation of posterior horn meniscal root tear involves 2 simple sutures in the meniscal root passed through 2 tunnels in the proximal tibia and tied over a cortical button (Figures 6 and 7).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Meniscal root tears (MRTs) are defined as radial tears within 1 cm of the meniscal root insertion, or an avulsion of the insertion of the meniscus. These injuries change joint loading due to failure of the meniscus to convert axial loads into hoop stresses, resulting in joint overloading and degenerative changes in the knee. Meniscal root repair is recommended in patients without advanced osteoarthritis (Outerbridge 3–4), in order to restore joint congruence and loading and therefore to avoid the long-term effect of joint overloading. Several techniques have been described. Improved knee function has been reported after meniscal root repair, but there are still conflicting reports on whether surgical treatment can prevent osteoarthritis.

No MeSH data available.