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Posterior meniscal root injuries

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ABSTRACT

Meniscal root tears (MRTs) are defined as radial tears within 1 cm of the meniscal root insertion, or an avulsion of the insertion of the meniscus. These injuries change joint loading due to failure of the meniscus to convert axial loads into hoop stresses, resulting in joint overloading and degenerative changes in the knee. Meniscal root repair is recommended in patients without advanced osteoarthritis (Outerbridge 3–4), in order to restore joint congruence and loading and therefore to avoid the long-term effect of joint overloading. Several techniques have been described. Improved knee function has been reported after meniscal root repair, but there are still conflicting reports on whether surgical treatment can prevent osteoarthritis.

No MeSH data available.


Pertinent anatomical relationships (right knee) as reported by Johannsen et al.7 A. Superior view. B. Posterior view. Reprinted with permission from Johannsen et al. (2012). ACL: anterior cruciate ligament bundle attachments; LPRA: lateral meniscus posterior root attachment; LTE: lateral tibial eminence; MPRA: medial meniscus posterior root attachment; MTE: medial tibial eminence; PCL: posterior cruciate ligament bundle attachments; SWF: shiny white fibers of posterior horn of medial meniscus.
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Figure 0004: Pertinent anatomical relationships (right knee) as reported by Johannsen et al.7 A. Superior view. B. Posterior view. Reprinted with permission from Johannsen et al. (2012). ACL: anterior cruciate ligament bundle attachments; LPRA: lateral meniscus posterior root attachment; LTE: lateral tibial eminence; MPRA: medial meniscus posterior root attachment; MTE: medial tibial eminence; PCL: posterior cruciate ligament bundle attachments; SWF: shiny white fibers of posterior horn of medial meniscus.

Mentions: The most consistent landmark for the lateral meniscus posterior root attachment is the lateral tibial eminence (LTE). The center of the lateral meniscus posterior root is consistently found to be located 1.5 mm posterior and 4 mm medial to the LTE. The posterior root of the lateral meniscus attachment is located 4 mm medial to the lateral tibial plateau articular cartilage edge, and 13 mm to the most proximal edge of the PCL tibial attachment (Johannsen et al. 2012) (Figure 4).


Posterior meniscal root injuries
Pertinent anatomical relationships (right knee) as reported by Johannsen et al.7 A. Superior view. B. Posterior view. Reprinted with permission from Johannsen et al. (2012). ACL: anterior cruciate ligament bundle attachments; LPRA: lateral meniscus posterior root attachment; LTE: lateral tibial eminence; MPRA: medial meniscus posterior root attachment; MTE: medial tibial eminence; PCL: posterior cruciate ligament bundle attachments; SWF: shiny white fibers of posterior horn of medial meniscus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016902&req=5

Figure 0004: Pertinent anatomical relationships (right knee) as reported by Johannsen et al.7 A. Superior view. B. Posterior view. Reprinted with permission from Johannsen et al. (2012). ACL: anterior cruciate ligament bundle attachments; LPRA: lateral meniscus posterior root attachment; LTE: lateral tibial eminence; MPRA: medial meniscus posterior root attachment; MTE: medial tibial eminence; PCL: posterior cruciate ligament bundle attachments; SWF: shiny white fibers of posterior horn of medial meniscus.
Mentions: The most consistent landmark for the lateral meniscus posterior root attachment is the lateral tibial eminence (LTE). The center of the lateral meniscus posterior root is consistently found to be located 1.5 mm posterior and 4 mm medial to the LTE. The posterior root of the lateral meniscus attachment is located 4 mm medial to the lateral tibial plateau articular cartilage edge, and 13 mm to the most proximal edge of the PCL tibial attachment (Johannsen et al. 2012) (Figure 4).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Meniscal root tears (MRTs) are defined as radial tears within 1 cm of the meniscal root insertion, or an avulsion of the insertion of the meniscus. These injuries change joint loading due to failure of the meniscus to convert axial loads into hoop stresses, resulting in joint overloading and degenerative changes in the knee. Meniscal root repair is recommended in patients without advanced osteoarthritis (Outerbridge 3–4), in order to restore joint congruence and loading and therefore to avoid the long-term effect of joint overloading. Several techniques have been described. Improved knee function has been reported after meniscal root repair, but there are still conflicting reports on whether surgical treatment can prevent osteoarthritis.

No MeSH data available.