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Posterior meniscal root injuries

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Meniscal root tears (MRTs) are defined as radial tears within 1 cm of the meniscal root insertion, or an avulsion of the insertion of the meniscus. These injuries change joint loading due to failure of the meniscus to convert axial loads into hoop stresses, resulting in joint overloading and degenerative changes in the knee. Meniscal root repair is recommended in patients without advanced osteoarthritis (Outerbridge 3–4), in order to restore joint congruence and loading and therefore to avoid the long-term effect of joint overloading. Several techniques have been described. Improved knee function has been reported after meniscal root repair, but there are still conflicting reports on whether surgical treatment can prevent osteoarthritis.

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Illustrations of the meniscal root tear classification system in 5 different groups based on tear morphology. For consistency, all meniscal tears are shown as medial meniscal posterior root tears in this illustration. The classification of 5 tear patterns was based on morphology: partial stable root tear (type 1), complete radial tear within 9 mm of the bony root attachment (type 2), bucket-handle tear with complete root detachment (type 3), complex oblique or longitudinal tear with complete root detachment (type 4), and bony avulsion fracture of the root attachment (type 5). Reprinted with permission from LaPrade et al. (2015b).
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Figure 0001: Illustrations of the meniscal root tear classification system in 5 different groups based on tear morphology. For consistency, all meniscal tears are shown as medial meniscal posterior root tears in this illustration. The classification of 5 tear patterns was based on morphology: partial stable root tear (type 1), complete radial tear within 9 mm of the bony root attachment (type 2), bucket-handle tear with complete root detachment (type 3), complex oblique or longitudinal tear with complete root detachment (type 4), and bony avulsion fracture of the root attachment (type 5). Reprinted with permission from LaPrade et al. (2015b).

Mentions: There are currently 2 classification systems for meniscal root injuries. LaPrade et al. (2015b) developed a classification system for both medial and lateral posterior root tears based on tear morphology. There are 5 distinct lesions: partial stable root tear (type 1), complete radial tear within 9 mm of the root attachment (type 2), bucket-handle tear with complete root detachment (type 3), complex oblique or longitudinal tear with complete root detachment (type 4), and bony avulsion of the root attachment (type 5) (Figure 1 and Table 1) (LaPrade et al. 2015b). Type 2 is the most common type of tear. Forkel and Petersen (2012) described a classification system for lateral meniscus posterior horn lesions, whereby the lesions can be divided into 3 subcategories. Type 1 is avulsion of the root at the attachment on the tibial plateau with an intact meniscofemoral ligament. Type 2 is a radial tear of the posterior horn with an intact meniscofemoral ligament. Type 3 is a complete injury of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus with rupture of the meniscofemoral ligament.


Posterior meniscal root injuries
Illustrations of the meniscal root tear classification system in 5 different groups based on tear morphology. For consistency, all meniscal tears are shown as medial meniscal posterior root tears in this illustration. The classification of 5 tear patterns was based on morphology: partial stable root tear (type 1), complete radial tear within 9 mm of the bony root attachment (type 2), bucket-handle tear with complete root detachment (type 3), complex oblique or longitudinal tear with complete root detachment (type 4), and bony avulsion fracture of the root attachment (type 5). Reprinted with permission from LaPrade et al. (2015b).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016902&req=5

Figure 0001: Illustrations of the meniscal root tear classification system in 5 different groups based on tear morphology. For consistency, all meniscal tears are shown as medial meniscal posterior root tears in this illustration. The classification of 5 tear patterns was based on morphology: partial stable root tear (type 1), complete radial tear within 9 mm of the bony root attachment (type 2), bucket-handle tear with complete root detachment (type 3), complex oblique or longitudinal tear with complete root detachment (type 4), and bony avulsion fracture of the root attachment (type 5). Reprinted with permission from LaPrade et al. (2015b).
Mentions: There are currently 2 classification systems for meniscal root injuries. LaPrade et al. (2015b) developed a classification system for both medial and lateral posterior root tears based on tear morphology. There are 5 distinct lesions: partial stable root tear (type 1), complete radial tear within 9 mm of the root attachment (type 2), bucket-handle tear with complete root detachment (type 3), complex oblique or longitudinal tear with complete root detachment (type 4), and bony avulsion of the root attachment (type 5) (Figure 1 and Table 1) (LaPrade et al. 2015b). Type 2 is the most common type of tear. Forkel and Petersen (2012) described a classification system for lateral meniscus posterior horn lesions, whereby the lesions can be divided into 3 subcategories. Type 1 is avulsion of the root at the attachment on the tibial plateau with an intact meniscofemoral ligament. Type 2 is a radial tear of the posterior horn with an intact meniscofemoral ligament. Type 3 is a complete injury of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus with rupture of the meniscofemoral ligament.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Meniscal root tears (MRTs) are defined as radial tears within 1 cm of the meniscal root insertion, or an avulsion of the insertion of the meniscus. These injuries change joint loading due to failure of the meniscus to convert axial loads into hoop stresses, resulting in joint overloading and degenerative changes in the knee. Meniscal root repair is recommended in patients without advanced osteoarthritis (Outerbridge 3–4), in order to restore joint congruence and loading and therefore to avoid the long-term effect of joint overloading. Several techniques have been described. Improved knee function has been reported after meniscal root repair, but there are still conflicting reports on whether surgical treatment can prevent osteoarthritis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus