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Deploying the Mental Eye

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ABSTRACT

Three observers performed a task designed to quantify their “pictorial relief” in visual awareness for a photograph of a piece of sculpture. In separate sessions, they were instructed to assume one of two “mental viewpoints.” The main objective was to investigate whether human observers have such command. All three observers could redirect their “mental view direction” by up to 20°. These observers experience “paradoxical monocular” stereopsis, whereas a sizable fraction of the population does not. Moreover, they had some experience in assuming various “viewing modes.” Whereas one cannot generalize to the population at large, these findings at least prove that it is possible to direct the mental viewpoint actively. This is of importance to the visual arts. For instance, academic drawings require one to be simultaneously aware of a “viewing” (for the drawing) and an “illumination direction” (for the shading). Being able to mentally deploy various vantage points is a crucial step from the “visual field” to the “visual space.”

No MeSH data available.


A montage of examples from Hogarth (1981). At left, illumination by a single, directed, distant source ( “Chiaroscuro–One-Third Front,” p. 43). This is perhaps most easily read in something like “object mode.” At right, what Hogarth calls “sculptural light” ( “Complete Forms,” p. 85), which is not illumination at all. This rendering almost forces it to be read in “landscape mode.”
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fig9-2041669515607710: A montage of examples from Hogarth (1981). At left, illumination by a single, directed, distant source ( “Chiaroscuro–One-Third Front,” p. 43). This is perhaps most easily read in something like “object mode.” At right, what Hogarth calls “sculptural light” ( “Complete Forms,” p. 85), which is not illumination at all. This rendering almost forces it to be read in “landscape mode.”

Mentions: It is also of interest to consider whether people might be able to train the command over their mental viewpoint. One would guess this to be the case and that some variety of yoga training might be indicated. However, the established techniques of the art academies—although aimed at “learning to see”—do not seem to push this point. It seems perhaps related to shading techniques, where shading by light flow is similar to our “object mode,” whereas the sculptural technique of edge shading is like our “landscape mode” (Hogarth, 1981; see Figure 9).Figure 9.


Deploying the Mental Eye
A montage of examples from Hogarth (1981). At left, illumination by a single, directed, distant source ( “Chiaroscuro–One-Third Front,” p. 43). This is perhaps most easily read in something like “object mode.” At right, what Hogarth calls “sculptural light” ( “Complete Forms,” p. 85), which is not illumination at all. This rendering almost forces it to be read in “landscape mode.”
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016826&req=5

fig9-2041669515607710: A montage of examples from Hogarth (1981). At left, illumination by a single, directed, distant source ( “Chiaroscuro–One-Third Front,” p. 43). This is perhaps most easily read in something like “object mode.” At right, what Hogarth calls “sculptural light” ( “Complete Forms,” p. 85), which is not illumination at all. This rendering almost forces it to be read in “landscape mode.”
Mentions: It is also of interest to consider whether people might be able to train the command over their mental viewpoint. One would guess this to be the case and that some variety of yoga training might be indicated. However, the established techniques of the art academies—although aimed at “learning to see”—do not seem to push this point. It seems perhaps related to shading techniques, where shading by light flow is similar to our “object mode,” whereas the sculptural technique of edge shading is like our “landscape mode” (Hogarth, 1981; see Figure 9).Figure 9.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Three observers performed a task designed to quantify their “pictorial relief” in visual awareness for a photograph of a piece of sculpture. In separate sessions, they were instructed to assume one of two “mental viewpoints.” The main objective was to investigate whether human observers have such command. All three observers could redirect their “mental view direction” by up to 20°. These observers experience “paradoxical monocular” stereopsis, whereas a sizable fraction of the population does not. Moreover, they had some experience in assuming various “viewing modes.” Whereas one cannot generalize to the population at large, these findings at least prove that it is possible to direct the mental viewpoint actively. This is of importance to the visual arts. For instance, academic drawings require one to be simultaneously aware of a “viewing” (for the drawing) and an “illumination direction” (for the shading). Being able to mentally deploy various vantage points is a crucial step from the “visual field” to the “visual space.”

No MeSH data available.