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Deploying the Mental Eye

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ABSTRACT

Three observers performed a task designed to quantify their “pictorial relief” in visual awareness for a photograph of a piece of sculpture. In separate sessions, they were instructed to assume one of two “mental viewpoints.” The main objective was to investigate whether human observers have such command. All three observers could redirect their “mental view direction” by up to 20°. These observers experience “paradoxical monocular” stereopsis, whereas a sizable fraction of the population does not. Moreover, they had some experience in assuming various “viewing modes.” Whereas one cannot generalize to the population at large, these findings at least prove that it is possible to direct the mental viewpoint actively. This is of importance to the visual arts. For instance, academic drawings require one to be simultaneously aware of a “viewing” (for the drawing) and an “illumination direction” (for the shading). Being able to mentally deploy various vantage points is a crucial step from the “visual field” to the “visual space.”

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) A straight scatterplot of depths values at corresponding points for the case of observer JK in Mode II with observer JW in Mode I. (b) The same data after a suitable gauge transformation. The straight comparison would indicate that the depths for the two cases are essentially uncorrelated. This conclusion is far off the mark though, for in a more suitable gauge the coefficient of determination (adjusted R2) is as high as .86.
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fig5-2041669515607710: (a) A straight scatterplot of depths values at corresponding points for the case of observer JK in Mode II with observer JW in Mode I. (b) The same data after a suitable gauge transformation. The straight comparison would indicate that the depths for the two cases are essentially uncorrelated. This conclusion is far off the mark though, for in a more suitable gauge the coefficient of determination (adjusted R2) is as high as .86.

Mentions: At this point, it might be of interest to illustrate what was said earlier, namely that a sensible comparison of depth values is only possible modulo gauge transformations. Figure 5 shows an instance, the comparison of observer JK in Mode II with observer JW in Mode I. Here, a straight comparison suggests that these cases lead to essentially unrelated data (coefficient of determination slightly negative, close to zero), whereas viewing the data in the right gauge reveals them to be essentially equivalent (coefficient of determination [adjusted R2] is .86).Figure 5.


Deploying the Mental Eye
(a) A straight scatterplot of depths values at corresponding points for the case of observer JK in Mode II with observer JW in Mode I. (b) The same data after a suitable gauge transformation. The straight comparison would indicate that the depths for the two cases are essentially uncorrelated. This conclusion is far off the mark though, for in a more suitable gauge the coefficient of determination (adjusted R2) is as high as .86.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016826&req=5

fig5-2041669515607710: (a) A straight scatterplot of depths values at corresponding points for the case of observer JK in Mode II with observer JW in Mode I. (b) The same data after a suitable gauge transformation. The straight comparison would indicate that the depths for the two cases are essentially uncorrelated. This conclusion is far off the mark though, for in a more suitable gauge the coefficient of determination (adjusted R2) is as high as .86.
Mentions: At this point, it might be of interest to illustrate what was said earlier, namely that a sensible comparison of depth values is only possible modulo gauge transformations. Figure 5 shows an instance, the comparison of observer JK in Mode II with observer JW in Mode I. Here, a straight comparison suggests that these cases lead to essentially unrelated data (coefficient of determination slightly negative, close to zero), whereas viewing the data in the right gauge reveals them to be essentially equivalent (coefficient of determination [adjusted R2] is .86).Figure 5.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Three observers performed a task designed to quantify their “pictorial relief” in visual awareness for a photograph of a piece of sculpture. In separate sessions, they were instructed to assume one of two “mental viewpoints.” The main objective was to investigate whether human observers have such command. All three observers could redirect their “mental view direction” by up to 20°. These observers experience “paradoxical monocular” stereopsis, whereas a sizable fraction of the population does not. Moreover, they had some experience in assuming various “viewing modes.” Whereas one cannot generalize to the population at large, these findings at least prove that it is possible to direct the mental viewpoint actively. This is of importance to the visual arts. For instance, academic drawings require one to be simultaneously aware of a “viewing” (for the drawing) and an “illumination direction” (for the shading). Being able to mentally deploy various vantage points is a crucial step from the “visual field” to the “visual space.”

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus